Resources

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions About Volunteering

Interested in becoming a 4-H volunteer but have some questions of your own? Check out the FAQs below to learn more:

What are the steps to becoming a 4-H volunteer?

To become a 4-H volunteer, you can either:

  1. Contact the MSU Extension office in the county where you want to volunteer, or;
  2. Fill out and submit the web form on this page

The 4-H program coordinator in the county you’ve selected will follow up with you about next steps in the volunteer enrollment process. This includes an application process where the program coordinator will get to know your interests and talents, as well as a background check.

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How much time does it take to be a 4-H volunteer?

You can dedicate as much or as little time as you’d like to volunteering with 4-H: an hour, a week, a month or a year! Because there are so many options for giving your time—chaperone a 4-H event, lead a club, offer a professional skills training, help at the fair, take kids to a 4-H workshop, become a mentor – there are many ways to volunteer. No matter your availability, there’s a 4-H volunteer opportunity waiting for you!

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What if I don’t know all the answers? Are there resources to help?

4-H volunteers are trained and supported by knowledgeable MSU Extension professionals who are there to help them every step of the way. Volunteers also have access to a variety of MSU Extension resources, including instructive workshops, educational curricula, ready-to-use activities and content experts, all of which enable and prepare volunteers to make an impact on youth across the state. No matter the topic, you’ll get the help you need to answer whatever question is thrown your way.

You can also check out the state 4-H volunteer training events or 4-H volunteer e-learning course for additional assistance.

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4-H Tech Wizards

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This program offers small-group mentoring experiences with a focus on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills. In addition to building positive relationships with their mentors, young people learn about STEM topics such as robotics, video editing and rocketry. They apply what they learn by conducting a service project of their choice.

Michigan 4-H Tech Wizards is currently operating in Macomb, Muskegon, Oakland, Ottawa and Wayne counties. For more information visit the 4-H Tech Wizards webpage.

News

News

With a wide variety of programming and more than 200,000 participants throughout the state, the news, stories and updates from Michigan 4-H Youth Development are ever-growing! Whatever you’re looking for, you’ll find the information in one of four helpful topic areas:

Michigan 4-H Today

Profiles of Michigan 4-H members, stories about individual projects and programs, and highlights from Michigan 4-H events. See Revolution of Responsibility stories from local 4-H’ers, read articles about community impact or catch an event recap here!

Michigan 4-H Today Archive

Keep up-to-date with upcoming 4-H events, latest 4-H program information, and available 4-H resources with the Michigan 4-H Today enewsletter. Created on a bi-monthly basis, these newsletters include Michigan 4-H Today stories, highlights of events and programs, and a look ahead at upcoming workshops, awards, programs and more.

MSU Extension 4-H Articles

Michigan State University Extension educators share their knowledge and expertise through online news articles every day. Among these are articles from 4-H Extension educators, who offer tips and training on everything from animal science projects to art exploration, engineering to environmental education, and leadership to life skills. Youth, volunteers and parents alike will benefit from this helpful information.

Press Releases

The most up-to-date information on statewide 4-H programming, including open registrations, upcoming statewide events, and other key Michigan 4-H information. Keep up on the latest news happening across the state with these 4-H press releases. Members of the media: feel free to use and reprint this information at will.

Support

Support

More than 200,000 young people participate in Michigan 4-H Youth Development programming each year and countless others are impacted by 4-H. As a result of their engagement with the program, young people are better prepared for a lifetime of success through the development of critical life skills, civic leadership and academic excellence.

How to give to 4-H

Want to give back to 4-H? You, your family, organization, company or corporation can support this crucial program and ensure Michigan 4-H Youth Development continues to improve the lives of youth each year. Consider giving the gift of your time as a Michigan 4-H volunteer or making a monetary donation through the Michigan 4-H Foundation. DONATE NOW!

How to receive support

Looking for a grant for your 4-H club or program? The Michigan 4-H Foundation annually offers competitive grant funds to encourage development of innovative 4-H program opportunities in local communities. These grants are designed to encourage program planning and participation by 4-H members and volunteers in partnership with county MSU Extension 4‑H program staff members. Click here to view a list of grant offerings and apply.

The Michigan 4-H Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that supports Michigan 4-H Youth Development programming, volunteer training, facilities and more! Learn more about the Michigan 4-H Foundation.

4-H Animal & Veterinary Science Camp

4-H Animal & Veterinary Science Camp

''Date:  June 15-19, 2015
Location:  MSU Campus, East Lansing MI

Michigan 4-H Animal and Veterinary Science Camp is for youth who are interested in exploring animal and veterinary science related projects and activities. Participants must be ages 13 to16 as of January 1, 2015.

This five-day pre-college program held at Michigan State University (MSU) is a partnership with the Michigan 4-H Youth Development, MSU Department of Animal Science and MSU College of Veterinary Medicine. Youth will explore fields relating to animal and veterinary medicine as well as participate in numerous hands-on learning activities. Participants will also gain animal handling experience while having the opportunity to visit and explore MSU farms and facilities. Throughout the week, teens will work their way through a veterinary science case study as a team and create a presentation to be critiqued by veterinarians. This is a fun and interactive camp that will allow youth to conduct activities, ask questions and problem-solve. Additionally, this camp will help youth explore various animal-related career fields while reflecting on their experiences and community programs.

How do I apply?
Youth ages 13 to 16 will need to complete the 2015 Michigan 4-H Animal and Veterinary Science Camp Application Packet and submit it by April 17. Space is limited! Campers will be selected on the basis of their applications.

Send your application by April 17, 2015 to Julie Thelen, 4-H Animal & Veterinary Science Camp, 474 South Shaw Lane, Anthony Hall 1287G, East Lansing, MI  48824-1039.

Questions?
Please contact Julie Thelen at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or at 517-432-1626.

What is the cost?
The cost to attend this five-day camp is just $300 ($310 for youth who are not 4-H members) and includes all meals, transportation to field trips, lodging and materials.

Additional Details
Additional information and details about the Michigan 4-H Animal and Veterinary Science Camp can be found in the Program Handbook or in the Promotional Flyer.

Extension 4-H Articles

Counties

4-H Renewable Energy Camp

4-H Renewable Energy Camp 2014

4-H Renewable Energy Camp Michigan State UniversityDate: June 23 - 27, 2014
Location: MSU Campus, East Lansing, MI

Explore how Michigan’s abundant natural resources and growing agriculture industry are changing the face of energy and what it means to your family, Michigan and the world!

Michigan 4-H Renewable Energy Camp, formerly 4-H Discovery Camp, is a five-day exploration camp held at Michigan State University for youth ages 13-19. Campers will explore ideas, research and opportunities in the field of energy as it relates to natural resources and agriculture.

4-H Renewable Energy campers will stay in a campus dorm and experience campus life, enjoying a mix of recreational opportunities and learning experiences that may include:

  • Tours of on-campus labs – See cutting-edge research centered on turning biomass into biofuel. Learn about brand new ideas and technologies that will play a significant role in our energy future.
  • Kellogg Biological Station – Participate in hands-on research of a new biofuel crop and discuss water quality/quantity needs, greenhouse gas emissions and sustainable production practices.
  • Net Zero home – Tour a home that generates as much energy as it uses and learn the technology that may shape homes of the future.
  • Carbon Green Bioenergy – Watch this facility turn 50,000 bushels of corn into 135,000 gallons of ethanol – every day. Participants will not only see how it’s done, but help them do it!
  • Wind Farm – See an operating wind farm and learn how much energy they can generate and how wind can impact our future.
  • MSU Power Plant – Tour the Power Plant and see how conventional and alternative energy sources are being used to power the university.

4-H Renewable Energy campers will also conduct their own experiments and create their own biofuel!

To learn about the outcomes and impacts this camp has on young people review the one-page 2013 Impact Summary.

Promotional Flyer

How do I apply?
Youth ages 13 to 19 will need to complete the 2014 Michigan 4-H Renewable Energy Camp Application Packet and submit it by April 25. Space is limited! Campers will be selected on the basis of their applications.

Send your application by April 25, 2014 to Dr. Jacob DeDecker, 4-H Youth Development, 446 W. Circle Dr., East Lansing, MI  48824-1039. Questions? Please contact Dr. DeDecker at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or at 517-432-7604.

What is the cost?
The cost to attend this five-day camp is just $190 ($200 for youth who are not 4-H members) and includes all meals, transportation to field trips, lodging and materials.

4-H Renewable Energy Camp Program Handbook of MSU Operational Requirements

 

FAQ

4-H Exploration Days

Frequently Asked Questions (& Answers!)

Your voices have been heard! In preparation for the 2014 4-H Exploration Days, check out the newly added “FAQ” section. We’ve compiled suggestions and questions gleaned from the past adult evaluation forms elsewhere. We’ll continue to add to this section as new questions are raised so be sure to check back later.

Medications
Bicycle Use
Cancellation Policy2014 Theme
Chaperones
Behavior
Early Arrivals
Health Care
Housing
Late Arrivals
Media Release Form
Orientation
Parking
Sessions
Session Field Trips
Shuttle Buses
Special Needs
Tours

Medication Use and How to Administer
Q: What if a participant needs to take medication during the event? How are medications are administered and by whom?
A: For all MSUE programs that are not state licensed camps, program participants are expected to discretely store and administer their own medications privately. If a medicine requires refrigeration, this need should be brought to the attention of the program coordinator with sufficient lead time to investigate the possibility of accommodating the need for refrigeration.  (For programs that include overnight housing in MSU residence halls, single serving over-the-counter medications such as Advil, Tylenol, Pepto-Bismol are available for sale in the residence hall snack shop.)

Bicycle Use
Q: Are we allowed to bring bikes to campus for 4-H Exploration Days?
A: Yes! Bikes are welcome on campus but require a special 4-H tag which you need to get at the time of check-in. (Be sure to ask for one.) Without the 4-H bike tag, you risk your bike being impounded.

Q: Where do I store my bike when I’m not using it?
A: Lock your bike to a campus bike rack whenever it’s not in use. Bike racks are outside the residence halls and all other campus buildings. You must bring your own lock – and be sure to use it to prevent your bike from being stolen. You may also store your bike in your room (as long as it’s okay with your roommate).

Cancellation Policy
Q: What if I need to cancel because of illness or a family emergency?
A: If you need to cancel for any reason, notify your county MSU Extension 4‑H staff as soon as possible. Be sure to provide the full name of the person cancelling and the date of cancellation. Early arrival fees, session fees and scholarship credits do not apply to cancellations and no-show fees. The refund policy is below:

$80 Pre-Payment – due upon registration ($90 for youth who are not 4‑H members)

  • Through May 5, 2014 deposits are fully refundable
  • Between May 6 and June 5, 2014, $80 is non-refundable
  • Between June 6 through the 2014 conference, $100 is not refundable

Chaperones
Q: What are the requirements to be a chaperone? Do chaperones need to be age 21 or older?
A: All adults housed with county delegations at 4-H Exploration Days must have gone through the background checks required by the MSU Extension Volunteer Selection Process. Chaperones for any Michigan 4-H overnight program must be age 21 or older, this includes county conference assistants (CCAs) who serve as the “head chaperone” for their county. The job descriptions for all adult roles at 4-H Exploration Days can be found at http://4h.msue.msu.edu/events/4-h_exploration_days/responsibilities.

Q: Can an adult serve as a chaperone to youth from a different county?
A: Possibly – if the 4-H program coordinators of the counties involved have arranged for “multi-county housing.” All counties are expected to provide one chaperone for every 10 youth of the same gender. Sometimes 4-H staff with small delegations work out sharing arrangements of their adults in order to provide adequate chaperone coverage. Arrangements for “multi-county housing” must be made before counties are assigned space within a residence hall to ensure that the affected county delegations are housed next to each other. Once housing assignments are made, it’s too late to arrange this unless the affected counties already happen to be housed next to each (i.e., same dorm, same floor).

Q: What if a county has youth participants enrolled, but no chaperones?
A:  If county 4-H staff are unable to identify their needed number of chaperones from within their own county near the end of registration, they should seek another county to provide chaperone coverage by consolidating together as a “multi-county housing group.” Collectively these counties must still meet the 1:10 adult/youth ratio. All multi-county housing groups must be determined by the time counties send in their completed “Housing Count Forms” to the State 4-H office which are due soon after registration ends.

Q: Can an adult leave the conference for one evening for a prior commitment?
A: This is discouraged but may be possible depending on a number of factors. The county staff, county conference assistant and other county chaperones must agree that they have adequate coverage during that chaperone’s absence. Another adult must be designated as the temporary substitute. The youth that are assigned to that chaperone must be informed of the temporary change in their chaperone assignment. The absence and substitute information needs to be noted on the absent chaperone’s Whereabouts Sheet posted on their housing room door.

Q: I have to take time off work to chaperone for Exploration Days. Will there be Wi-Fi at the residence halls so I can keep up with my responsibilities back at the office?
A: Yes, there will be wireless-internet in the main lobby of each residence hall, but only 20% of the individual dorm rooms have coverage. Please reference the wireless map that shows the availability of Wi-Fi in the MSU buildings.

Q: If I need to send a fax back home during the event, where can I do this?
A: There is not a fax machine available for use in the residence halls. However, the State Children & Youth Institute/4-H office located across campus in the Morrill Hall of Agriculture has a fax machine you can use – but you have to get there between 8 a.m.-5 p.m. A scanner is also available at the State 4-H office if needed.

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Behavior
Q: Is there a dress code for the participants while on campus?
A: Yes. It states, “Participants should dress casually, but neatly and respectably. Unacceptable attire includes clothing that exposes undergarments or excessively exposes the body (such as cropped, low-cut or extremely tight shirts, tube tops, short shorts, excessively baggy or extreme low-rise pants).” You can find the entire dress code in the back of the registration book under the 4-H Exploration Days Code of Conduct and on the web site.

Early Arrivals
Q: Is it possible to arrive the night before?
A: Early arrival arrangements can be made for long distance delegations (primarily U.P. counties) and counties who have participants bicycling to the event as an organized county 4-H activity. These groups come early as part of an organized and supervised county group. The early arrival option is not listed on the paper registration form; these counties pre-determine their arrival plans and check the early arrival box on the electronic registration form submitted by county 4-H staff. The county must provide same sex chaperone supervision for Tuesday arrivals the same as they do for the rest of the conference. There are no 4-H Exploration Days activities offered for early arrivals. Early arrival check-in is 4-5 p.m. for county delegations biking in; 5-9 p.m. for everyone else. There is an added cost to cover lodging on Tuesday and breakfast on Wednesday.

Q: If we said we are coming in on Wednesday morning, can we still come in Tuesday if we change our mind?
A: Yes, if you change your registration ahead of time and live a long distance from MSU and have Tuesday evening same gender chaperone arrangements made for all early arriving youth. Please let your county know and have them email the change to the event registration secretary. Remember, there is no Tuesday food service at the dorms, no planned activities, and an added fee for Tuesday lodging and Wednesday breakfast.

Q: Our delegation is traveling from the Upper Peninsula and needs to arrive on Tuesday night because of the long distance. How late can we get there for check in on Tuesday?
A: Please try to arrive by 9 p.m. and definitely before the building doors are locked for the night at 11 p.m. If you need to arrive later than 9 p.m., please alert the event general headquarters at 517-353-2922.

Health Care
Q: Will the participants have access to a nurse or health care more than just first-aid while they are at 4-H Exploration Days?
A: Yes, a Nurse’s Station is located in an apartment in one of the residence halls. The exact location will be listed in the event Activity Guide. The Nurse’s Station is staffed at all times from 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday until 1:30 p.m. on Friday. If a participant becomes ill or injured, they can notify their CCA and county staff, then report to the nurse. If medical care is needed beyond what the event nurse can provide, the patient will be taken to a medical facility. The cost will be billed to the family or their insurance. Some counties purchase special insurance for their county delegation to defray medical costs. Check with your county 4-H program coordinator to see if this is done in your county.

Q: My child has severe allergies and carries an epi-pen. Is that a problem at 4-H Exploration Days?
A: Anyone who needs an epi-pen must provide their own and administer it themselves. That said, the participant is urged to say to the adults they’re with something like “If I have an allergy attack I’ll need my epi-pen injection immediately. Here’s where I’ll be keeping it. I’d appreciate your assistance with making sure I get it out quickly and assist me in keeping my hand steady during the injection if needed. It can go through my clothes and the needle needs to be fully injected so I get the entire dosage. 911 will also need to be called ASAP.”

Housing
Q: Can a youth register as part of one county delegation but be housed with another county?
A: No. Youth and chaperones must be housed with the county delegation that submitted their registration and payment.  

Q: Can I request a roommate for Exploration Days? What if they are from a different county?
A: Roommate assignments are made at the county level in early June, usually at the pre-event county orientation meeting. Let your county staff know you have someone you’d like to room with. Unfortunately, you cannot request to room with someone from another county. Everyone must be housed with the county delegation that submitted their registration and payment.  

Q: Can my child room with an adult chaperone?
A: An adult chaperone may share a room with unrelated youth if there is at least one other child assigned to the room as well. No child that is unrelated to an adult chaperone will share a room alone with an adult. Parents should have reviewed and signed the “Overnight Housing Permission Form” included in the registration book. If the form is not signed, the child will be put in a room only with other youth under age 18. Each chaperone has been through the MSU Extension Volunteer Selection Process and has completed a background check.

Q: My child has the opportunity to stay with a family member off-campus during Exploration Days. Is it possible to commute?
A: No, there is not a commuter option available for Exploration Days.

Q: Our entire family is attending. Can we arrange to be housed together?
A: Family members can be housed together only if they are the same gender. Males and females are housed on separate floors and usually on different sides or wings of the residence hall.

Q: How strict are the rules about keeping boys off the girl’s floor and girls off the boy’s floor? Are exceptions ever made?
A: Males and females should not be on each other’s housing floors with only one possible exception with close supervision. Some counties may need to hold the county meeting they have shortly after Wednesday check-in in a study lounge on a housing floor due to meeting space shortages in the dorm’s common areas. Counties that are assigned meeting room space on a housing floor should have a chaperone gather their participants of the opposite gender in the lobby and escort them to and from the housing floor study lounge where the entire county delegation will meet.

Q: Do the dorms have air conditioning?
A: No they do not. You may want to bring a fan to help out with the heat if the weather is warm and encourage others to do the same.

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Late Arrivals
Q: What happens if someone arrives late?
A: Late arrivals begin check-in at their hall’s 4-H Information Center then proceed to the hall reception desk on the side of the hall to which they are assigned. The location of each residence hall’s 4-H Information Center is listed in the 4-H Exploration Days Activity Guide. The activity guide will be posted on the Exploration Days web site in late May.

Media Release Form
Q: I’m uncomfortable with my child being photographed. Do I have to sign the media release form?
A: We urge you to reconsider since the photos/video shot at the conference will only be used for promotional purposes and participants are not identified by name. If you still don’t want to sign the form, please make sure to indicate that you have read it and you are choosing not to sign it so staff will know that you didn’t miss it accidentally. Please note that it will be up to your child to avoid being in camera shots.

Orientation
Q: My son/daughter missed the county pre-event orientation meeting for Exploration Days. What should we do?
A: Check with your county office. Sometimes larger counties will offer more than one orientation. If not, you’ll need to discuss and agree on other make up arrangements. It is very important that each participant go through a county-based orientation before 4-H Exploration Days.

Parking
Q: Where do people park their cars at Exploration Days? Is parking different for instructors and chaperones?
A: Lot 91, south of Hubbard Hall past the railroad tracks, is available at no cost to everyone involved in 4-H Exploration Days. (It will be shown on the Activity Guide map available in late May.) You can unload your luggage at the dorm where you’ll be housed and then move your car to the free lot. Unless you’re an instructor who is hauling supplies to and from your session classroom, you should not need your car during the event.

Instructors who need to transport supplies and have sessions located outside of the residence halls will be provided with complimentary parking permits for a small number of designated parking lots nearer their classroom than Lot 91.

Q: Does a vehicle with a disability placard or plate still need an MSU parking permit to park on campus?
A: Those who have been issued a disability placard or plate may park in signed accessible spaces without an MSU parking permit as long as the disability placard or plate is current, valid and properly displayed. Those with placards or plates that display a free-parking sticker issued by the state do not have to pay at meters.

Sessions
Q: How do I know if the sessions my child wants to sign up for will be age appropriate?
A: While most of the sessions at 4-H Exploration Days are geared towards the 11-19 age group, some are more suitable for a narrower age range. Age appropriateness is listed at the end of each session description in the registration book. Look there for any age restrictions and make sure that all session choices written on the registration form are open to youth that are your child’s age.

Q: How do participants find out their session assignments?
A: The county 4-H staff are notified of each session assignment the day after the registration is submitted. When and how each county 4-H staff notifies their participants varies from county to county. This information will be provided at the county’s pre-event orientation meeting if not before then. At the pre-event orientation meeting, participants will complete a Personal Data Sheet that lists their session assignments. If there have been any changes to a session assignment since the initial registration, the new session information should be provided and listed on the sheet.

Q: If a session is cancelled, how are reassignments made? And how are participants notified?
A: At the end of registration, the 4-H Explorations Days staff may cancel sessions with low enrollment. Anyone displaced from a cancelled session will be reassigned to one of their other session choices when possible. (If new session choices must be made, your county 4-H staff will be asked to obtain more choices from the participant and relay the new choices back to the event registration secretary.) Once a session reassignment is made, the county office will receive an email informing them of the change. The county 4-H staff then need to pass on the cancellation and reassignment information to the participant.

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Session Field Trips
Q: My session goes on a field trip. Where do I meet the bus?
A: If your session is going on a field trip, look for the field trip bus loading site on your Activity Guide map designated by an “F.” All field trips will leave from this location at the scheduled session starting time unless a different departure time or location is listed in the Activity Guide. Arrive at the field trip bus loading area 15 to 20 minutes before the scheduled departure time of your session. Once your bus leaves, there is no other way for you to get to your session.

Shuttle Buses
Q: Will there be shuttle buses available during 4-H Exploration Days? Can all participants use the system?
A: Only three 4-H Exploration Days shuttle buses are available to help get participants to the other side of campus. These buses, identified by green “4-H” signs, can only transport a small percentage of everyone at the conference so please walk as much possible! While it may seem convenient to hop on a bus to get to class, remember it will be very crowded and the wait for a bus may be longer than the amount of time it’d take you to walk!

The shuttle route is shown on the campus map in the center of the Activity Guide. Shuttle buses will stop at each place designated on the map by a circled number. These are the only locations where you will be able to get on and off shuttle buses.

During swimming times, one or two of the regular shuttle buses will switch to drive the Swim Bus Shuttle loop to take participants directly to and from the pool.

Special Needs

Q: How are accommodations handled for a special needs participant?
A: A buddy system is used for disabled or other special needs participants who need extra support or assistance to have a positive learning experience at 4-H Exploration Days. A special needs participant must be accompanied by a same-sex adult or older teen “buddy” who is able to address those special needs. The buddy must accompany the special needs participant to the event, attend the same session and serve as his or her roommate. They will stay together during the entire conference (meals, sessions, free time activities, etc.).

Q: I have a specific diet restriction. Where can I request special dietary needs?
A: At the time you submit your registration, please be sure to describe your dietary needs in the space provided on the registration form. The information you submit will be provided to the culinary staff after county residence hall assignments are made. Because there are a wide variety entrees and side dish choices to choose from at each meal, most people with special dietary needs can make selections that fit their needs without making any special arrangements. Look for the menu on the What’s New 4-H Exploration Days web page. Those that have dietary needs that require special arrangements will be put in touch with the MSU chef assigned oversight for Exploration Days to ensure that their needs are accommodated.

Q: How is lunch accommodated for someone with a dietary restriction who is assigned to a session with an all-day field trip that gets box lunches? 
A: We review the class lists of sessions getting box lunches to see if anyone who noted a special dietary need on their registration form is assigned to any of those sessions. If so, we give this information to the food service staff that makes the box lunches. They will make a different lunch for that participant and label it with his/her name on it. This is only food provided as part of the session. In the off chance someone else brings their own snack and offers to share, the participant with the dietary restriction should decline.

Q: What services are available to those with mobility limitations?
A: The MSU buses used for the campus shuttle and county, school and commercial buses used for session field trips are not wheelchair accessible.

CATA (the local bus service) offers a service called “Spec-Tran” for a fee. They operate from 5:45 a.m. to10:30 p.m. during the week. You can call the RCPD Office (Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities) to set up a ride. Their office number is 517-353-9642. CATA and the RCPD office will work with the child to set her up with a “temporary pass” to be able to access the services. Once she has her temporary pass, she will be able to work with the RCPD office to set up a schedule of when she needs rides. All rides must be scheduled at least 24 hours in advance, two weeks prior being the earliest available to set up a schedule.

For more information on this service and for pricing, visit their website at: http://www.cata.org/CATAServices/SpecTranService/tabid/130/Default.aspx

Q: My child is on a special medication that requires refrigeration. How can this be accommodated?
A:  Under the unique circumstance that a participant needs to bring a medication that requires refrigeration, arrangements can be made to place a dorm-sized refrigerator in the room. After county housing assignments are made, the county 4-H staff should contact the Exploration Days coordinator to provide the room number and name of the participant with the refrigerated medication need.

Q: My child has medication to take during 4-H Exploration Days, who’ll make sure she takes it?
A: It is the responsibility of your child to make sure they take the medication at the appropriate time in the correct dosage. You can alert their chaperone and ask that they remind her, but ultimately the child needs to manage this on her own.

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Tours
Q: Tours of some campus facilities are available during recreation time. How do I get to one of those?
A: Follow the directions in the Activity Guide. If it’s far enough away to need bus transportation, meet the tour bus at the Tour Bus Loading Site shown in your Activity Guide. Note: this will be a different spot than the Field Trip Loading Site.

4-H State Shooting Sports Tournament

Michigan 4-H State Shooting Sports Tournament

“4-H State Shoot”

This annual event provides Michigan 4-H shooting sports members with the opportunity to test their skills and earn recognition with other 4-H members from all over the state.

Events include:

BB Gun Air Rifle .22 Rifle
Trap Skeet Muzzleloading
Target Archery 3-D Archery

When: Saturday, August 9, 2014
Where: Blue Water Sportsman Association

Tournament Results

2014 Individual Results (Corrected)

2014 Team Results

2013 Individual Results

2013 Team Results

2012 Results

2011 Results

Tournament Rules, Information & Registration Forms

Registration details, general tournament rules, division information (ages), event specific rules, awards presentation, and more.

Youth Registration Form

Registration Instructions

  • County staff must have all registrations entered on-line by Monday, July 14, 2014. Therefore, participants MUST have their registration forms and payment into their County 4-H Office by the date set for their County prior to July 11, 2014.
  • Registration fee is $20/youth participant.
  • Registration confirmation will be sent to the email address entered on the competitors’ registration. It is the competitor’s responsibility to make sure they check their email to confirm they are registered for the correct event.  No changes will be made after July 16th.
  • Absolutely no late or on-site registration changes will be permitted.

Volunteer Registration Form

  • Counties must register at least one adult volunteer for every five youth registered.

State Shoot media, medical agreement

Schedule of Events

  • Competitor/Equipment check-in and shooting times will vary depending on the range and event.

  • Check-In Times for Ranges: See Relay/Squad page

  • Volunteer check-in will occur at the range to which you’ve been assigned. If you are unable to fulfill your assigned volunteer job, YOU are responsible for finding a replacement. Notify the range event coordinators of any substitutions upon check in. Awards will be presented on site approximately one hour after all events have finished. 

    • Target archery volunteer orientation at range at 8:30am (morning shift) and 10:30 am (“afternoon” shift).
      3-D archery volunteer orientation at 3-D range at 7:30am
    • BB and Air Rifle volunteer orientations (registrars, range officers, scorers) at 8:00 am. at rifle range; .22 Rifle orientation is at 9:00 am.

Volunteer Assignments

Relays & Squads

The relay and squad rosters can be found by clicking the Relays and Squads link near the top on the left hand side.

Blue Water Sportsman Association Directions

Please use the directions posted on the Blue Water website; many a car has gone astray following Mapquest, Google Maps or Garmin/GPS directions!

Many thanks to Blue Water Sportsman Association and Members for hosting us this year!

Lodging, Camping, Local Attractions

Port Huron Chamber of Commerce

http://www.bluewaterchamber.com/

St. Clair Chamber of Commerce

http://stclairchambermi.com/

Camping Near Kimball, MI

http://www.rvparkreviews.com/regions/Michigan/Kimball.html

Hotels Near Kimball, MI

http://www.google.com/hotels/?gl=US&cu_link=1#search;l=Kimball,+Michigan;q=hotels+near+kimball,+mi;d=2014-06-15;n=1;si=;av=r


Contact

Nick Baumgart, Extension Educator
Environmental & Outdoor Education & Shooting Sports
Michigan State University Extension
527 Stephenson St.
Norway, MI 49870
Phone: 906-774-0363
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Also see the Tournament Rules page for contact information for Event Coordinators, who can provide discipline specific information.

Check back regularly for updates to event information. Details and documents will be posted as they become available.

Resources

4-H Today Archive

4-H Today Archive

Past editions of 4-H Today are available by clicking the below links.

June - July 2014

April - May 2014

February 2014 Special Edition

February - March 2014

December 2013 - January 2014

October - November 2013

August - September 2013

June - July 2013

April 2013 Special Edition

April - May 2013

February - March 2013

January 2013 Special Edition

November - December 2012

October 2012 Special Edition

September - October 2012

August 2012

July Special Edition II

 July Special Edition I

July-August 2012

June 2012 Special Edition

May-June 2012

May 2012 Special Edition

April 2012

April 2012 Special Edition

January-February 2012 

December 2011

November 2011

October 2011

September 2011

July - August 2011

June 2011

May 2011

Frequently Asked Questions

4-H State Shooting Sports Tournament

Frequently asked questions about the State Shoot

How is the location and date selected for the tournament?

The location of the tournament is determined by which clubs are willing to host, and also have the necessary range space and configuration, headquarters, and (most importantly) parking to accommodate the 500 competitors and 2500 spectators and volunteers. The date is based on availability in the host club’s calendar.

Why are individual scores combined for team totals?

Participation in the tournament has more than tripled in the last six years (507 participants in 2012), and is approaching the point where we needed to either reformat the event or drastically reduce the number of participants. We are simply running out of time and space! We want to give as many youth the opportunity to participate in the tournament as possible, so we chose to follow the National 4-H Shooting Sports Invitational procedure of combining individual scores for team totals, which allowed us to not only increase the number of total participants, but in many cases, increase the course of fire allowing competitors to shoot more during the event.

Why can’t team members stand next to each other on the firing line?

This is also a procedure we adopted from the national 4-H tournament. Event coordinators use a random selection process to assign shooters to relays and squads. Having team members shoot at different times of the day helps reduce the influence of factors that change throughout the day (temperature, wind, angle of the sun, rain, fatigue) on team scores. In other words, it helps ‘level the playing field’ for things we can’t control. More importantly, the state shoot is a time and place to meet, talk to and learn from 4-H members and volunteers who you don’t see on a regular basis. It’s an opportunity to expand your group 4-H friends from a community or county to a statewide network. Preparing for and traveling to the tournament nurtures existing relationships; talking with and learning from new folks at the tournament helps build new ones. 

Why are there no spectators on the 3-D archery course?

Safety is the number one reason spectators are not allowed on the 3-D course. With 4-5 shooters on a squad, there is simply no room for the 20-40 spectators per squad to watch from a safe distance. As the trails are narrow, uneven and sometimes sloping, we want to reduce the chance of tripping, falling, and other accidents as much as possible while the youth navigate the course with their bows and arrows. Another issue is the more secluded nature of this sport makes it harder to enforce the ‘no coaching’ rules. This is a great event for more experienced 4-H archers to build their character and self esteem, and practice responsibility and problem solving.  However, it is hard for them to do that when their coaches/parents are using this time to coach and parent, rather than quietly observe. Luckily, there are plenty of volunteer jobs available so parents and coaches can stay occupied while their members compete! 

Why does 4-H require more safety equipment than competitive shooting organizations?

The focus of 4-H Shooting Sports, and all 4-H programs, is youth development. Our goal is to help youth develop life skills to be healthy individuals, achieve academic success and be prepared for the workforce; we just so happen to do that (in this case) through the shooting sports. We work hard to ensure the physical and emotional safety of 4-H members and their families. One way we do this is making sure we use all the safety measures (eye and ear protection, appropriate footwear, other protective equipment) to which we have access. 

Why are certain shooting accessories used in the tournaments of competitive shooting organizations prohibited here? 

Again, this comes down to our goal of youth development and providing a safe environment. The goal of other shooting organizations is often to increase the number of people in their sports and to develop highly competitive athletes. In 4-H, we focus on the foundations of shooting sports in order to help youth develop responsibility, decision-making, self esteem, and other life skills. Some 4-H members reach a level in their sport where they become focused more on their skill as a competitive shooter. This is often when they start using highly technical (and often expensive) gear/accessories that are not necessary for the course of fire and distances we shoot in this tournament, and can be unsafe in the hands of less experienced shooters. When shooters reach this level of achievement in their sport, they might consider shooting with an organization whose focus is on the competition and development of athletes. They can continue growing as a 4-H member by becoming a teen or adult leader, helping other 4-Hers gain life skills through the shooting sports.

Science Blast

young girl participates in 4-H Science Blast

As Michigan looks to cre­ate a new generation of leaders, science must be at the forefront. The Science Blast in the Class curriculum was developed as part of MSU Extension’s “I Know MI Numbers” initiative to enhance science literacy and serve as a “go-to” resource both inside and out­side the traditional classroom. It offers educators the opportunity to connect in-school learning with real-world experiences.

Visit the Science Blast in the Class resource page to download the complete teacher’s guide. 

Science Blast in the Class is a great resource for teachers in the classroom, those working in after-school programs or as part of a club. The guide includes 13 hands-on lessons in topics including Animal Science, Environmental Science and Plant Science, as well as a wealth of support material that educators can utilize to enrich the science learning process.

Some of the lessons are being used in this summer and fall’s “I Know MI Numbers” Science Blast activities, where thousands of youth throughout Michigan are engaging in fun, hands-on science activities.

The lessons found in the Science Blast in the Class handbook are benchmarked according to the latest Michigan High School Content Expectations and/or Grade Level Content Expectations, as appropriate. While each lesson includes suggested grade levels, many lessons are appropriate for teaching or reteaching concepts to older and younger youth.

Science Process

The science process is something we do every day – we just don’t stop to think about it. Students will learn the steps of the science process, understand the “shape” of science and realize how relevant science is to their daily lives.

Animal Science

Students love animals, whether it’s the small pet at home or the big giraffe at the zoo. The Animal Science section of Science Blast in the Class helps students what makes animals different and the role genetics play, understand disease transmission and control, and understand how animals use their sense for survival and reproduction.

Environmental Science

Michigan is home to some of the greatest natural resources in the world. Science Blast in the Class offers several lessons that enhance students’ understanding and appreciation of the world around them. Learners will enhance skills in observation, inference, critical thinking and reasoning; learn how biofuels are made; learn the importance of adaptations in fish and other animals; learn how to identify different fish families; and understand the importance of water quality.

Plant Science

Plants are essential to life and the Science Blast in the Class Handbook will help students appreciate and understand plant science in a fun, hands-on way. Youth will learn the key components and functions of plants, growth, survival and reproduction; learn how to pick the best vegetables for their school or home gardens by using the scientific method; and understand some of the factors in photosynthesis and the connection between light and energy storage in plants.

Contact

For more information on Science Blast and Science Blast in the Class, contact Jake DeDecker, program leader for MSU Extension’s Children and Youth Institute, at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 517-432-7604''517-432-7604 or your county Extension office.

4-H Staff Information

4-H Great Lakes Natural Resources Camp

Information for 4-H Staff

Useful information for MSU Extension 4-H staff about promoting and applying for 4-H Great Lakes Natural Resources Camp.

Charter fishing

Recruitment and Promotional Materials

Forms and Payment Information

Post Acceptance Forms

Cost & How to Apply

4-H Great Lakes Natural Resources Camp

How Much Does Camp Cost?

The 2014 camper fee is $345 for Michigan 4-H members and $355 for Michigan youth who are nonmembers.  The fee includes meals and snacks, lodging, a T-shirt, and program and activity fees. Donors to the Michigan 4-H Foundation, Michigan Sea Grant Extension and MSU Extension generously offset about 25 percent of the real $450-a-camper cost! Out-of-state campers will be accepted with a $450 fee if space is still available after May 1.

A limited number of state 4-H scholarships are offered for teens with financial need. 4-H members can also contact your county MSU Extension office to see if local scholarships may be available.

How To Apply

Camper applications are due by May 1, but space is limited so early application is encouraged. Do not send payment with your application. Space is limited to 70 campers so early application is recommended.

Counselor applications are due by March 10.

How Camper Selections Are Made

  • Returning campers (25-30 max)
  • New campers (40-45 max)
  • Gender balance (36 max for each gender)
  • 4-H member/non 4-H youth ratio (non 4-H will be limited)
  • Geographical representation of campers from across state.

Successful applicants will receive more forms with their acceptance letters to complete and return with full payment by May 31, 2014. Beginning June 6, wait-listed applicants will be offered spaces forfeited by campers who failed to meet the deadline.

Time for reflection

2014 Applications

Getting There

You might be able to carpool with others from your county. A carpool list and more will be sent in July.

Post Acceptance Forms

Refund and Cancellation Policy

Fees are refundable minus the handling fees that follow.

  • Before June 1 – $45 not refundable
  • June 1 to July 1 – $145 not refundable
  • July 2 to camp – $200 not refundable

Refunds for cancellations will be processed in the month after the cancellation is made. For example, a June cancellation refund will be processed in July.

Registration Book

4-H Exploration Days

Youth must be age 11 by January 1, 2014 in order to attend. All participants must submit their forms and payments to the county MSU Extension office (see page 22 of the registration book). This is done to connect participants to their county 4-H staff since the local staff are responsible for identifying chaperones and holding a pre-event orientation meeting. If you need to obtain contact information for your county MSUE 4-H staff, visit: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/county/ and click on your county name.

4-H Exploration Days registration goes from mid-March through April with session assignments made on a first-come, first-served basis. As you select your session choices, be sure to watch for age restrictions! Age requirements for sessions are based on your age as of January 1, 2014.

Registration Book

2014 4-H Exploration Days Registration Book

The 4-H Exploration Days Registration Book offers a complete listing of the sessions and details on the current year’s event. The choice of which sessions to take is yours to make!  

For more general information on 4-H Exploration Days, contact:

Judy Ratkos, Senior Program Leader
Phone: 517-432-7613
Fax: 517-353-4846
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

OR

Laura Potter, Educational Programs Event Coordinator
Phone: 517-432-2963
Fax: 517-353-4846
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

4-H Youth Development
Michigan State University Extension
446 W. Circle Dr., Rm. 240
Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture
East Lansing, MI  48824

Relays and Squads

Michigan 4-H State Shooting Sports Tournament

Relays and Squads

In order for the State Shoot to run as smoothly and efficiently as possible, competitors have been organized into relays and/or squads within events. Relays and squads are assigned randomly to avoid any advantage of one competitor or team over other, and also minimize the effect of changes throughout the day (wind, sun, heat, rain, fatigue, etc.) on team scores. While we understand the desire and some advantages of team members shooting together, we believe that reducing the weather variables and, more importantly, providing an opportunity for youth to meet, talk to, and compete next to new people from around the state provides a unique and valuable youth development opportunity.

Click on events below to see relays and squads for each event. Also note check-in and tentative shooting times for those events. Competitors not present for their check-in and shooting time may lose their opportunity to compete.

Relays and Squads will be posted below approximately one week before the tournament.


Rifle Events:

Shotgun Events:

Archery Events:

Check-In Times for Ranges:

  • Shotgun Events:
    Check-in is 60 minutes prior to the posted shooting time.
  • Muzzleloader: 
    Relay 1: 9:30 a.m.
    Relay 2: 11:30 a.m.
  • Target Archery:
    Relay 1: Check in 8:30 a.m. start shooting at 9:00 a.m.
    Relay 2: Check in 10:30 a.m. start shooting 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.
  • 3-D Archery:
    Check-in at 8:00 a.m.; shooting starts 9:00 a.m
  • Air Rifle
    Relay 1:  8:00 a.m.
    Relay 2:  11:00 a. m.
  • BB Gun
    Relay 1:  8:00 a.m.
    Relay 2:  11:00 a.m.
  • .22 Rifle  
    Relay 1: 9:00
    Relay 2: 12:00

Volunteer Assignments:

Your involvement is critical to creating a safe and efficient event! You will be able to find your assignment organized alphabetically by county and last name on the 2014 Volunteer Assignments.

PLEASE check in at your assigned location at, or before, the designated time. If no time is designated, check in at least 15 minutes before the participant check-in starts.   Range Officers will make specific assignments when you check in.

County Coordinators that indicated an event / range preference have been assigned.  Please let the Range Officer know that you are a county coordinator so that they can give you an assignment that allows for some flexibility.  Your county coordinator role takes precedence, but we need all the help we can get on the ranges.

If you are unable to fulfill your assigned duty,  it is critical that you find a replacement and let the range officer know of the change.

Contact

Nick Baumgart, Extension Educator
Environmental & Outdoor Education & Shooting Sports
Michigan State University Extension
527 Stephenson St.
Norway, MI 49870
Phone: 906-774-0363
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Tournament Rules

4-H State Shooting Sports Tournament

Tournament Rules

General Tournament Rules

Division Information

Rifle Events

          BB Gun Rules

          BB Gun Rules Exceptions

          Air Rifle Rules

          .22 Cal. Rifle Rules

Shotgun Events

          Skeet

          Trap

Archery Events

         General Archery Rules  (apply to all archery events/divisions)

         Target Archery

         3-D Archery

Muzzleloader Events

         Muzzleloader Rules

Questions?

Do you need clarification about an event or rules? Please email your question to the appropriate person listed below, making sure to include a return email address and phone number where you can be contacted.

General Tournament Questions

  • Nick Baumgart - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
  • Jeff Harthy – .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Rifle Events (BB, Air Rifle, .22)

  • Bob Richards - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Muzzleloading

  • Bruce and Lisa Sweet – .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Shotgun

  • Jim Moore – .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Target Archery

  • Chip Culbertson – .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

3-D Archery

  • Troy Reynolds - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Jump Into Foods and Fitness

Jiff juggling foodWelcome to Jump Into Foods and Fitness, where Jiff the Joey Kangaroo will teach you what he has learned about growing up strong and healthy by eating a balanced diet from the five food groups and getting plenty of physical activity. Jiff wants to be your guide through Jump Into Foods and Fitness, which is designed to help 8- to 11-year-olds learn about the following:

  • Pyramids for Health
    You’ll learn about how you can use the MyActivity Pyramid and the MyPyramid for Kids to discover the best foods and fitness activities for you.
  • Go the Distance With Grains
    Learn about the foods of the grain group by doing activities like the “Great Grain Obstacle Course” and make your own jump rope so you can hop, skip and jump your way to fitness.
  • High Five for Health
    Did you know that there are five kinds of fruits and vegetables? These super foods provide you with vitamin A, vitamin C and fiber – things that keep you healthy and strong. Learn more about these important parts of your daily diet and about ways to build your fitness through activities like the “Fitness Scavenger Hunt.”
  • Moooving and Motion
    In “Muscle Mania,” explore the 12 muscle groups that are important to keep you moving and active. You’ll also learn about the foods that provide the vitamins and proteins that help build and repair these muscles.
  • Power Up the Day:
    Learn how eating a nutritious breakfast gives you the energy you need to start your day right. Explore how morning fitness activities can give you even more power for your day!
  • On the Go
    When you’re on the go, snacks can provide the energy you need. You’ll learn about how you can create healthy snacks using the five food groups, and you discover “activity snacks” you can use to improve your fitness.
  • Choices for Good Health
    Learn to read the labels on foods so you can make your best nutrition choices. You’ll also design a game using your own fun movement activities.
  • Celebrating JIFF
    It’s a nutrition and fitness party! Celebrate what you’ve learned in JIFF by creating your own goals for future fitness and eating choices.

Through your time with JIFF, you’ll also learn about food safety, including the importance of washing your hands to “slam dunk germs” and the safest ways to store the foods you eat.

Jiff stretchingWant to Get Involved With JIFF?


JIFF the Joey invites you to participate in a JIFF session in your area! Contact your county Michigan State University Extension office to see which foods and fitness programs they have available.

JIFF Helps You Take Action!


After you have learned more about healthy and active living, you can put your ideas into action! Decide on one or two nutrition or physical activity goals to start this week and write them on a large sheet of paper. Decide with your family where you can put them so you will see them every day! JIFF the Joey Kangaroo sometimes keeps goal sheets on the refrigerator, bathroom mirror or at eye level on a door.

Now develop your JIFF Plan of Action to make your goals happen for you! Your actions may be dancing during TV commercials, trying new food choices, starting to jump rope or skate, or joining a sports team! Use the JIFF Eating and Physical Activity Goal Sheet to “jump start” into action!

Jiff playing basketballJiff the Joey wants you to remember:

Build strong bodies and brainpower with . . .

Snacking choices such as fresh and dried fruit; crunchy veggies; whole grain crackers, tortillas or pita; cheese chunks or yogurt; granola, nuts or cereal

AND

Physical activity choices such as playing active games with friends; jumping rope or hula hooping; playing basketball or baseball; biking, skating or skateboarding; dancing or playing hopscotch.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

B’Onko Sadler, Associate Program Leader
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-432-7618''517-432-7618

Prospective Mentors

What to expect in a 4-H youth mentoring program

A mentor in a 4-H mentoring program can expect personal ongoing support, encouragement and guidance from 4-H staff as the mentoring relationship progresses. To make certain that both the mentee and the mentor are having a positive, life enriching experience, 4-H staff will conduct regular communication with the mentor, the mentee and the parent or guardian to discuss the match, problems and progress. Most 4-H programs typically expect a mentor to spend at least one hour each week with the mentee, with most of the programs lasting for at least one year. Many 4-H programs provide group activities, program recognition events and complimentary tickets to community events in which mentors and mentees may optionally participate. At the completion of the program, 4-H staff will support and assist in the closure of the mentoring relationship. It is the goal of 4-H staff both to see that youth develop and reach positive academic, career and personal goals through a successful mentorship, and also that the 4-H mentor gains personal fulfillment and self-development through contribution to the community and individual.

To learn more about specific expectations and goals in the 4-H mentoring program in your area, go to “4-H Youth Mentoring Programs in Michigan” in the Resources below and look for a county near you. Then press the link for contact information.

Mentor selection and criteria

TeensEach 4-H mentoring program has its own eligibility criteria and policies for selecting and screening volunteers. To learn more about the requirements and selection procedures in your county, see “4-H Youth Mentoring Programs in Michigan.” Press the link for your county. Call and speak to the mentoring program coordinator.

Listed below are general volunteer criteria required of all MSU Extension 4-H mentoring programs.

A volunteer must:

  • Be willing to complete the county’s mentoring program application process
  • Be willing to complete the MSU Extension Volunteer Selection Process
  • Be willing to follow all program policies and procedures
  • Not falsify information during the course of the screening process
  • Not use illicit drugs
  • Not use alcohol or controlled substances in an excessive or inappropriate manner or while participating as a volunteer mentor

Listed below are possible application requirements: (For the actual application requirements for your county’s mentoring program, contact the mentoring program coordinator for your county on the 4-H Youth Mentoring Programs in Michigan resource.)

  • Application
  • MSU Extension Volunteer Selection Process (required)
  • Driving record
  • Copy of driver’s license
  • Interview
  • References
  • Confidentiality agreement
  • Mentor contract

Characteristics of a good mentor

Good mentors:

  • Are active listeners
  • Are patient and caring
  • Are flexible and open to new ideas
  • Have a good attitude
  • Are dependable and reliable
  • Set realistic and appropriate goals
  • Listen and accept guidance and feedback

Michigan counties currently offering mentoring progams

New 4-H mentoring programs are being developed in counties across Michigan each year. To see an updated listing of Michigan counties currently offering 4-H mentoring programs, see “4-H Youth Mentoring Programs in Michigan.”

Other mentoring programs in Michigan

Michigan 4-H Youth Development strives to continue to develop and offer caring and supportive mentoring opportunities for youth and volunteers in Michigan. Unfortunately, not every Michigan county currently operates a 4-H mentoring program. If you are a volunteer interested in becoming a mentor in a county not currently operating a mentoring program, there are many other mentoring opportunities with other organizations in Michigan. Visit Mentor Michigan to see a list of organizations offering mentoring opportunities in your area.

Contact

Lisa Bottomley, Senior Specialist
4-H Youth Development
Michigan State University
446 West Circle Dr., Agriculture Hall Room 240
East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
Phone: 517-432-1039''517-432-1039
Fax: 517-353-4846
E-mail:.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Veterinary Science

''Did you also know that Michigan State University has one of the best veterinary medicine programs in the world? MSU‘s veterinary medicine staff work closely with the Michigan 4-H Veteri
nary Science program at the state level to provide real-life scenarios and situations to bring science to life.  Youth who learn about veterinary science at an early age have an advantage of later becoming a student in the veterinary medicine programs at MSU. Veterinary science covers medicine, animal health, disease transmitted to humans, animal management and feeding processes.

Even if becoming a veterinary isn’t your goal, there are still so many great reasons that participating in a 4-H veterinary science project could be right for you.  In a 4-H veterinary science project, you can explore the broad scope of veterinary medicine and animal health. You’ll also learn how animal management and feeding affect animal health while also learning valuable life skills.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Julie Thelen, 4-H Livestock and Veterinary Science Educator

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-432-1626

Money Management

How can youth learn to obtain the funds they really want? Money Management programs can teach youth how to earn, save and invest all of their money.

Knowing how to handle money will have a lasting impact on youth and their future. It can be the difference between:

  • Having $1,000 and $1,000,000
  • A future of debt of a future of profit
  • The panic of living paycheck to paycheck or realization of your dreams and goals

Learning the basics of personal finance as a youth is a positive step toward a successful financial future. The resources below offer information, activities, tools and an opportunity to engage in the learning process.

Contact

Laurie Rivetto, 4-H Extension Educator
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Proud Equestrians Program

HorseSharing skills and knowledge is what the 4-H Proud Equestrians Program (PEP) is all about. Riders with disabilities and the volunteers who work with them can gain great satisfaction through this therapeutic horseback riding program.

With the help of trained and caring volunteers, riders can improve balance, coordination, posture and muscle tone. Horseback riding also increases self-esteem, self-confidence, discipline and social growth. But more importantly, riding is fun!

The Michigan 4-H Proud Equestrians Program was introduced in 1974 in partnership with Lida McCowan, executive director of the Cheff Center for the Handicapped, and with support from a three-year grant from the W.K. Kellogg and C.S. Mott Foundations. Today, this equestrian program reaches out to individuals with disabilities both young and old throughout Michigan, providing opportunities to learn to ride a horse and develop horsemanship skills.

How to get involved

The Michigan 4-H Proud Equestrians Program offers opportunities for people with and without disabilities to work together as:

  • Riders – Young people and adults with physical, developmental, emotional or multiple disabilities
  • Volunteers – Young people and adults who assist riders as needed until the riders develop the skills they need to ride independently
  • Instructors – People who teach riding, horsemanship and stable management skills; special certification as a therapeutic riding instructor for handicappers is required
  • Horse owners – The “heroes” of the program are the quiet, horses and ponies, trained to respond to the needs of riders with disabilities; owners of suitable animals who are willing to loan, lease or donate to their local program are always needed

The dates and times that programs are offered vary according to community needs and resources. Some programs meet once or twice a week for eight to ten weeks during spring and fall. Other classes meet only during summer, and some other programs meet year-round.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or

Karen Waite, 4-H Youth Equine Specialist
4-H Proud Equestrians Program Coordinator
Michigan State University
1287J Anthony Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824-1111
Phone: 517-353-1748''517-353-1748
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Need a Mentor?

Mentor and menteeWhat is a mentor?

  • A friend
    A mentor listens and gives thoughtful, caring advice and assistance.
  • A role model
    A mentor has had successful life experiences and is willing to share them.
  • A link to the community
    A mentor is knowledgeable about the community and is willing to research any information that is unknown to him or her. He or she will teach the young person how to access local resources.

Responsibilities of mentees in successful mentoring relationships

Mentees:

  • Respect mentors’ time, efforts and loyalty
  • Are committed to success
  • Share goals and expectations with mentors
  • Challenge themselves to tackle new projects and face their fears
  • Meet with their mentors on a regular basis

Michigan counties currently offering mentoring programs

New 4-H youth mentoring programs are being developed in counties across Michigan each year.

To see an updated listing of Michigan counties currently offering 4-H mentoring programs, please go to “4-H Youth Mentoring Programs in Michigan”.

Playing BasketballOther mentoring programs in Michigan

Michigan 4-H Youth Development strives to continue to develop and offer caring and supporting mentoring opportunities for youth in Michigan. Unfortunately, not every Michigan county currently is operating a 4-H mentoring program. If you are interested in enrolling your child in a county not currently operating a mentoring program, there are many other mentoring opportunities with other organizations in Michigan.

Visit Mentor Michigan to see a list of organizations offering mentoring opportunities in your area.

How to enroll

Enrollment procedures vary from county to county. Therefore, to enroll in a 4-H mentoring program in your county, contact the mentoring program coordinator in the county listed in “4-H Youth Mentoring Programs in Michigan.” He or she can provide you more information about enrollment for that specific program.

Contact

Lisa Bottomley, Senior Specialist
Phone: 517-432-7622''517-432-7622
Fax: 517-353-4846
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Awards/Scholarships

4-H Scholarships and Recognition Program

4-H Scholarships

Aside from the benefits you get just from being in 4-H, you may also have opportunities to earn scholarships for college as a result of your 4-H participation. 4-H Scholarships gives you the details on what’s available, eligibility requirements and how to apply.

4-H Recognition Program

Whether you are a youth participant or a 4-H volunteer, there are many opportunities to be recognized for your good work in 4-H, whether with a certificate, plaque, medal or cash award. 4-H Recognition Program tells you the ways you may be recognized, what’s necessary to be eligible and how to apply, if necessary.

Post-Conference Activities

4-H Capitol Experience

Post-Conference Activities: After 4-H Capitol Experience… What’s Next?

''As a participant at Michigan State University Extension’s 4-H Capitol Experience Program, you learned about a current policy issue and about how policy decisions are made. You had an opportunity to examine a selected issue from a variety of viewpoints. You talked with people who influence policies, including lobbyists, state agencies personnel, representatives of local organizations, legislative aides and legislators.

Post-Event Resource Materials

The post-conference resources listed below are available in Adobe PDF format and may be photocopied for distribution. For example, you could use them with 4-H leadership groups or other 4-H meetings, as you work on an issue in your local community, with a church or civic group or as part of a classroom project.

Contact

Darren Bagley, 4-H Youth Development Educator
MSU Extension-Genesee County
605 N. Saginaw (corner of University Blvd), Suite 1A
Flint, MI 48502
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
tel: (810) 244-8515; fax: (810) 341-1729

For information about the Michigan Legislature, visit www.michiganlegislature.org

For information about state government visit www.michigan.gov

Programs

Come on in!

Aisha wants to learn to paint, and have the confidence to show off her paintings.

Dan wants to make a rocking chair for his mom, and learn to follow through on what he starts.

Evette wants to run her own business, and make a difference in her urban neighborhood.

Trevor wants to explore making biofuel, and pave the way for studying science in college.

Beth wants to raise a steer and compete in judging, while improving her public speaking skills.

They all have their reasons for being in 4-H. Now it’s your turn.

Pick your program(s) and start your journey!

Pre-Conference Activities

4-H Capitol Experience

Pre-Conference Activities: Before You Come to 4-H Capitol Experience


What is a pre-conference activity? Why is it necessary?

''

As a participant in 4-H Capitol Experience, you are asked to complete at least one pre-conference activity from the list of options. These activities are designed to help you learn about local government in your community so that you can:

  • Better understand the similarities and differences between the workings of state and local governments.
  • Recognize the connections on certain issues between the state and local levels (such as school funding).
  • Collect some information that will be useful for local programs and projects after you have returned from Capitol Experience.
  • Obtain background information that may be helpful as you talk to policymakers in Lansing.

How can you conduct a pre-conference activity?

Select an option (listed below) that interests you. If you need some help in choosing an activity or in deciding how to proceed, talk with your local 4-H staff, leader, or teacher. Use the “A General Overview of Local Governments in Michigan” section of this page as background concerning the different types of local governments.

After selecting your option, carefully plan out the steps needed to gather the necessary information. Who do you need to contact? What questions should you ask? It isn’t necessary to write a report on what you discover, but it is important to make a few notes. There will be some opportunities for sharing that information at Capitol Experience and it will help you carry out a project after Capitol Experience.

Examples of pre-conference activities

Select at least one of the following options:

1. Learn about the responsibilities of elected officials.
Talk to one or two elected officials in your community,such as – mayor, county commissioner, city council member, and township board member. A few of the questions you might ask to help you better understand one of these units of government include:

  • What are some of the specific responsibilities of the position?
  • What are some of the services and programs that unit provides to its citizens?
  • What is the largest challenge or most difficult problem currently facing that unit of government and that elected official?
  • Does that official have much contact with the state legislators and/or other state policymakers (for example, someone from the Department of Natural Resources)?
  • Why would a village want to become a city? What are the benefits?

2. Follow a local issue.
Read your local newspaper carefully to help you follow an issue of current concern. (Keeping a clipping file might be helpful. Be sure to bring it with you to Capitol Experience.) Talk to family members and your friends about their opinions on the issue.

Some of the issues of concern in local communities might include:

  • Location of a landfill
  • Location of a halfway house
  • Residential treatment for the mental health system
  • School funding
  • Funding for certain local programs
  • Michigan’s economy
  • Local evacuation plans for the disabled or residents without private transportation.

After you have followed the issue for a while, has your opinion changed?

Do you see any ways that you might share your opinions on these issues with the local government officials that are dealing with it?

3. Attend a city council, township board or county commission meeting.
Call the city or township clerk to find out the meeting schedule. (You can find this telephone number in the white pages under your local government listing.) These are public meetings so all citizens are welcome to attend and simply observe the proceedings. A few suggestions as you watch the meeting include:

  • Can you figure out who some of the people are that are at this meeting – both as officials at the meeting and as members of the audience? What are some of their responsibilities?
  • What types of issues are being discussed at the meeting?
  • Are there any examples of citizens being actively involved with the decisions being made by the township board? (For example, a citizen might be giving testimony, writing letters, or otherwise actively participating in the process.)
  • How does the issue affect young people in your community?

4. Attend a school board meeting.
Call your local school superintendent’s office to learn the location and date of the next meeting. These are also public meetings where observers are welcome. A few suggestions as you watch the meeting include:

  • What issue or issues seem of major concern at the present time? Can you describe some of the different viewpoints on that issue?
  • Is there any reference to state government as some of these issues are discussed? How?
  • Are there any examples of citizens involved with the decisions being made by the school board? (For example, a citizen might be giving testimony, writing letters, or otherwise actively participating in the process.)

5. Familiarize yourself with your state senator or representative’s committee assignments.
Learn more about State Government by reading the Citizen’s Guide to State Government  from the Michigan Legislature website. In addition to writing your legislators about Capitol Experience, contact them (either directly or through their staff) to find out about their committee assignments in the Michigan Senate or House. Questions you might want to ask include:

  • What do these committees do?
  • What bills are these committees currently addressing?
  • Who are the chairpersons of these committees? Where are they from?

6. Investigate the effect of a petition.

  • How do petitions influence the policy making process on the local level?
  • Who decides the wording of a petition? How many signatures are required?
  • Find examples of petition drives that have affected your community.
  • Where do you submit petitions?

7. Tour a jail and/or juvenile detention facility.
Be sure to call ahead to schedule an appointment for your tour. Some of the questions you might ask include:

  • How does the length of sentences vary for different crimes?
  • Are prison sentences for juvenile and adult offenders different? If so, how do they differ?
  • If a juvenile is charged with a crime, where are they housed in the county?
  • What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?

8. Visit a court session and observe what takes place.
Several different levels of the judicial system are open to the public.(District and Circuit courts are the most familiar. Probate Court, the Court of Appeals and Michigan Supreme Court are the others.) Call your Circuit Court or District Court administrator to find out the court schedule. (You can find this telephone number in the white pages under your local government listing.) A few suggestions as you watch the meeting include:

  • Can you figure out who some of the people are in the courtroom? What are their roles and responsibilities?
  • Who determines the defendant’s sentence – the judge or a jury? If there is a jury, how did the jurors get selected?
  • Who provides testimony?

9. Compare different forms of taxation by interviewing government officials.
Taxation comes in many different forms including taxes on county sales, property, income, state sales, intergovernmental transfers, motor vehicles licenses, county landfill charges and dog licenses.

  • Interview elected office holders, political party officials and other community leaders on the advantages and disadvantages of some of these different forms of taxation.
  • Who determines what should be taxed?
  • Who determines what the tax rate should be? (Public vote, elected officials, appointed officials?)
  • Is there a difference between a tax and a fee?

10. “Shadow” a local government official.
Make arrangements to spend part or all of a day with an appointed official. Possibilities include:

  • Tax assessor
  • County planner
  • Zoning official
  • Building inspector
  • Public health nurse
  • State inspector (DNR, Health Department)

Ask the government official questions such as:

  • How did you get this job?
  • What training was needed?
  • What are the major responsibilities of this job?
  • Do you work with the policymakers in Lansing? How?

11. Become familiar with the Michigan House/Senate districts in which you live.
Knowing how large, populous, and similar or diverse your districts are will promote understanding of how your legislators operate, the pressures they have to respond to and perhaps why they do some of the things they do.

  • How diverse is the tax base in your district?
  • Did the population of your district increase or remain the same in the 1990 census? How did this affect how federal funding is allocated?
  • Have the district boundaries changed over the last 10 years? How and why have they changed?

12. Learn about a political party.
Attend a local political party meeting. (The telephone numbers should be listed in the phone book, possibly in the yellow pages under political organizations.) Some questions to ask include:

  • What issues are of current concern?
  • How does one become a member of that party?
  • What does the party do prior to an election and between elections?

A General Overview of Local Governments in Michigan

Michigan has eight different types of local government. Each of these eight is designated as units of local government because they have taxing power or authority. In 2005, Michigan had 1,858 general-purpose governments:

General Purpose Governments:

  • Villages (263)
  • Cities (275)
  • Townships (1,242)
  • Counties (83)

Special Purpose Units:

  • School Districts (553)
  • Intermediate School Districts (57)
  • Community Colleges (28)
  • Special Authorities (# unknown)

Each of these units has its own governing body and it uses tax revenues for general operation.

Counties

The county is the largest subdivision of state government. There are 83 counties in Michigan, ranging in size from 316 square miles in Benzie County to Marquette County with 1,828 square miles. Most counties are approximately 500 to 900 square miles. Populations range from 2,300 in Keweenaw County to 1.8 million in Wayne County.

Townships

Townships have jurisdictions of nearly 95% of Michigan’s total land (36 million acres). Originally townships were to be 36 square miles, but they presently range in size from 600 square miles in McMillan Township to 2/3 of a square mile in Royal Oak Township. Township populations vary from about 100 to 80,000.

Village and Cities

There are 263 villages in Michigan with populations ranging from 150 to more than 8,000. Whenever a village incorporates as a village, it stays within a township. Incorporation as a city removes the area from township government. There are 275 cities with populations ranging from less than 500 to about 714,000 in Detroit. City governments have a great deal of flexibility in governmental structure, taxing powers and writing of ordinances.

Authorities

The number of authorities is not documented. Theses units are formed to provide special services within or between units of government.

Local Schools– K-12

Local school districts are governmental areas with definite boundaries for the purpose of taxation and school attendance. These boundaries do not necessarily coincide with those of a city or township. School districts are administered by locally elected school boards, which vary in size (an average of 5 to 9 members).

Intermediate School Districts

The intermediate school districts are separate governmental units whose purpose is to coordinate special programs and services for a group of school districts. The 57 intermediate school districts in Michigan are governed by boards (5 to 7 members), which are either selected by the local school districts or elected by popular vote.

Information compiled by Elizabeth Moore, Extension Specialist, Michigan State University; updated 2011 by Claire Layman. Michigan Manual, published by the Legislative Service Bureau, is the primary source of the data listed above as well as the U.S Census Bureau’s website American FactFinder. The following websites contain more information about Michigan’s units of local government:

For More Information

For more information, contact:

Darren Bagley, 4-H Youth Development Educator
MSU Extension-Genesee County
605 N. Saginaw (corner of University Blvd), Suite 1A
Flint, MI 48502
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
tel: (810) 244-8515; fax: (810) 341-1729

For information about the Michigan Legislature, visit www.michiganlegislature.org
For information about state government visit www.michigan.gov

Preparing for Camp

4-H Great Lakes Natural Resources Camp

Preparing for Camp

MSU Extension 4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp 2014 Program Handbook

The Camp Program Handbook includes the Michigan 4-H Youth Code of Conduct and 4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp Rules. All participants, volunteers and staff members are expected to abide by the code of conduct, the event rules and all other MSU regulations in order to attend this program. Everyone involved in this camp must sign an agreement stating they’ve read, understand and agree to the Michigan 4-H Code of Conduct and program rules in order to be allowed to participate in the program.

Boating

What’s the 4-H Great Lakes Natural Resources Camp Schedule Like?

Camp begins with check-in from 3 to 4 p.m. on Sunday and ends with campers’ departure at 11 a.m. on Saturday. Here’s a tentative daily schedule:

7 a.m. * Wake-Up (optional early morning activities include fishing, polar bear swim,
running and bird watching)
8 a.m. Breakfas
8:30 a.m. Camp and Personal Area Clean Up
9 a.m. Great Lakes Ecology Exploration Sessions (attend a different session
each day)
Noon Lunch 
12:45 p.m. Announcements, Group Meetings, Personal Time
1:30 p.m. Recreation Learning Options
3:30 p.m. Swimming and Beach Activities
5:30 p.m. Supper 
7 p.m. Group Recreation
8:15 p.m. Evening Program
9:15 p.m. Snack
9:30 p.m. Campfire
11:15 p.m. Curfew – Campers Must Be in Their Assigned Cabins 
* 1st time campers rise earlier one day to go charter fishing

Great Lakes Ecology Exploration Sessions 

Fisheries

  • Hunt for Great Lakes Invaders – Join U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff in the hunt for Great Lakes invaders.  While exploring Lake Huron’s coastal habitats, you’ll use technology to identify and map invasive phragmites and learn how to protect our Great Lakes coastal habitats from the threats of invasive species.
  • Charter Fishing and Fisheries – First-time campers go charter fishing then learn about and fillet their catch. Returning campers sample local lakes and streams for native fish and other aquatic life and see these organisms and their habitats up close.
  • Wildlife – Learn how to find and identify wildlife while exploring the habitats where they live. Become a wildlife biologist for a day and experience some of the techniques used to help manage our valuable wildlife resources.
  • Watersheds & Lakes – Study water samples, explore an inland lake from aboard a boat, and learn about the freshwater version of marine biology!  Collect mud from the lake bottom using scientific equipment, see what pollutes our lakes and learn ways to help protect our waters.
  • Woodland Wonders – We need trees and forests for food, shelter, healthy soil and clean air and water. Become a forester for a day and explore the special forest communities of Northern Michigan. Learn how to keep our forest healthy and productive for both humans and wildlife.

Recreation Learning Options

You’ll attend five different options. For first time campers, this includes filleting fish caught during charter fishing. Your choices include archery, air rifle shooting, crafts, hiking, canoeing, photography, a sea lamprey research presentation, rock and fossil hunting at a local quarry, lighthouse tour, outdoor survival, orienteering and swimming enhancement for those who can’t swim well or at all. Strong swimmers will also have the chance to go kayaking, sailing and snorkeling.

What to Bring . . . And What NOT to Bring to Camp

Be sure to label everything you bring to camp with your name.

Definitely bring the following items with you to camp: Consider bringing the following items with you to camp:
  • Athletic shoes with closed toes and heels for getting wet and muddy or aquatic sandals with straps
  • Athletic shoes with closed toes and heels for everyday wear
  • Flashlight with spare batteries
  • Insect repellent
  • Light jacket (for charter fishing on Lake Huron—1st time campers only)
  • Jeans
  • Long-sleeved shirt
  • Shorts
  • Sleeping bag (bedroll)
  • Pillow and pillow case
  • Rain gear
  • Swimsuits (one-piece or modest 2-piece for girls)
  • Shampoo, soap, deodorant
  • Towels and washcloths
  • T-Shirts
  • Underwear
  • Water bottle or canteen
  • Flip flops or water shoes for shower use (water shoes can also be used)
  • Any medication (prescription and non-prescription) that you’ll need to take during camp MUST be in the original container and turned in to the camp health officer upon check-in. This is required by state law. (Anyone arriving to camp without an original med container will not have it dispensed until a fax is sent from the physician confirming it’s a legitimate prescription.)
  • Winning smile and enthusiasm
  • Binoculars
  • Camera (plus film or memory card)
  • Fishing equipment
  • Musical instrument (nonelectrical)
  • PFD (personal flotation device or life jacket)
  • Snorkeling equipment
  • Sunglasses
  • Hat
  • Water shoes
Leave the following items at home:
  • Archery equipment
  • Electrical equipment
  • Electronic games
  • Firearms
  • Good clothes
  • Hair dryers, curling irons and other primping items
  • Jewelry
  • Knives (including jack-knives or fillet knives)
  • Radios, record players, stereos and personal music devices (such as CD, I-Pod and MP3 players)
  • Snack food, pop or energy drinks
  • Cell phones
  • Sandals or shoes with open toes and heels (aquatic sandals with straps are okay)

Directions to Camp

Camp Chickagami is located along Lake Huron in the northeast corner of the Lower Peninsula in Presque Isle (between Rogers City and Alpena.)

Why Attend

4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp

Why Attend?

Camper with turtleTop Ten Reasons to Attend This Camp

  1. Have fun in the great outdoors doing camp activities such as fishing, boating, swimming, hiking and having a campfire!
  2. Learn about and enjoy Great Lakes ecology and Michigan’s diverse natural resources.
  3. Explore natural resources management issues and what you can do to help.
  4. Find out about careers related to the Great Lakes and natural resources.
  5. Learn from Michigan State University faculty, MSU Extension program staff and others who are also natural resources experts.
  6. Discover environmental education projects that you can do at home.
  7. Make new friends from across the state and learn about where they are from.
  8. Enjoy a chance to be independent from your family in a safe, friendly environment.
  9. Learn new ideas, skills and techniques you can use for the rest of your life.
  10. Develop your leadership abilities.

More Opportunities for Returning Campers

If you’re a returning camper, you’ll be able to participate in the “regular” camp activities, plus these extras:

  • Take a night hike.
  • Try out advanced scientific techniques.
  • Take on extra leadership roles.
  • Be amazed as you notice things you may have missed or didn’t have time to participate in when you attended camp last time.
  • Strengthen your skills and qualifications to become a camp counselor in future years.

Campfire

How Camp Helps in School

The educational experiences at camp help prepare, reinforce and enrich what youth have already studied and will study at school in the future related to biology and earth sciences based on the expectation established by the Michigan Department of Education. Through a variety of camp sessions, youth will be exposed to four of the five Michigan science curriculum standards in earth science and three of the five standards in biology for grades 8 to 12. To learn more, visit the following resources:

MSU Pre-College Scholarship Opportunity

Campers who enter eighth, ninth or tenth grades following their involvement are eligible for nomination to apply for a $2000 MSU Pre-College Achievement Scholarship. Campers will be invited to apply based on criteria such as attitude, behavior and active participation. The funds will be applied toward the first year at MSU as a degree-seeking student. For more information, visit the 4-H Scholarships area of this site.

Rabbits & Cavies

Rabbit ShowingWhat hops like a rabbit and sounds like a rabbit and smells like a rabbit, but isn’t a rabbit? A cavy! No matter which you choose, rabbit or cavy, it could be the ideal project for you if you’re interested in an animal project but live in an urban area. They’re also great for small farms or rural areas where lack of space, facilities or money make it hard to raise larger animals.

Rabbits and cavies let you gain experience in feeding and managing animals for fun, companionship and profit.

Michigan 4-H Rabbit Fitting and Showmanship Guide Demonstration Videos:

Michigan 4-H Rabbit Showmanship-Handling

Michigan 4-H Rabbit Showmanship-Examining

Michigan 4-H Rabbit Showmanship-Posing

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Katie (VanderKolk) Ockert, 4-H Animal Science Educator
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-432-5270

Livestock

''4-H livestock projects provide great opportunities for learning related to animal science and animal production practices while youth gain valuable life skills.  Youth can participate in 4-H livestock projects in three areas:

  • 4-H Beef Projects
    4-H beef projects allow youth to learn about breeds, selection, grooming, production, management, showmanship, marketing and careers through breeding or market animals.  Learn basic principles of animal science and gain life skills, such as responsibility, by owning, caring for and keeping records on one or more head of livestock.  Youth can start their own herd with breeding cattle or raise a market animal that produces a meat product for human consumption.  
  • 4-H Sheep Projects
    Through a 4-H sheep project, youth will explore all aspects of sheep production through animal selection, management, showmanship and marketing.  Additionally, youth will use critical-thinking, problem-solving and decision-making skills to help make good decisions about sheep management.  Whether a market lamb or breeding stock project, youth will learn more about the sheep industry while gaining valuable life skills to help them succeed.
  • ''4-H Swine Projects
    Youth will explore a variety of factors related to swine production through a 4-H swine project. Both market hogs and breeding stock enable youth the opportunity to learn about animal selection, management, health, showmanship, marketing and careers. While caring for their project, youth will learn principles of animal science and gain life skills, such as keeping records, through practicing good management techniques. Youth can also learn more about their project by completing Youth Pork Quality Assurance Plus certification.

In addition to Beef, Sheep and Swine 4-H projects, the 4-H animal evaluation area allows for additional animal science and life skills building.

  • 4-H Animal Evaluation
    The 4-H animal evaluation project area allows youth the opportunity to learn about animal selection, evaluation, breed character, production factors, marketing and careers in the livestock industry.  Youth gain knowledge of animal differences and are able to evaluate and select animals based on a desiredset of characteristics.  Additionally, they increase their public speaking ability by learning to prepare a logical, coherent set of notes that allow youth to present an effective set of oral reasons.

Consider participating in the statewide livestock judging or meats judging contests:

''

  • 4-H Livestock Judging - The state level contest of the 4-H animal evaluation project level is the Michigan 4-H Livestock Judging Contest.  The contest is in conjunction with the MichiganLivestock Expo in July.
  • 4-H Meats Judging – The state level contest is the Michigan 4-H Meats Judging Contest/FFA Meats Evaluation & Technology Career Development Event (CDE).  The contest is in conjunction with the Michigan Ag Expo in July.

Livestock management is a part of Michigan’s important agricultural industry, which is vital to the state’s economy and future prosperity. Participating in 4-H livestock projects could set you on the path to an excellent career in agriculture.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Julie Thelen, 4-H Livestock and Veterinary Science Educator

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-432-1626''517-432-1626

Department of Animal Science
Web: http://www.ans.msu.edu/

Horses & Ponies

Horse and riderWhen you own or care for a horse or pony, you experience pride and responsibility, and develop valuable social and physical skill. You can be involved in a 4-H horse project in lots of ways, and many activities don’t require horse ownership. You can participate in show, trail or endurance riding, study horse science, participate in quiz bowls, rodeos, judging teams and much more!

4-H Proud Equestrians Program (PEP)

Riders with disabilities and the volunteers who work with them can gain great satisfaction through this therapeutic horseback riding program. With the help of trained and caring volunteers, riders can improve balance, coordination, posture and muscle tone. Horseback riding also increases self-esteem, self-confidence, discipline and social growth. But more importantly, riding is fun!

For more information about horse programs for youth, visit the MSU Horse Youth Programs web page.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Karen Waite, 4-H Equine Specialist
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-432-0383 or

Taylor Fabus, Instructor
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-353-1748

Department of Animal Science
Web: http://www.ans.msu.edu/

Goats

GoatGoats—dairy type, pygmy, Angora and Boer—make great 4-H projects. They are relatively easy to handle, interesting and inexpensive to keep. In addition to learning about traditional animal care in a 4-H goat project, you can explore the use of products that come from goats such as milk, meat and fiber. You also can participate in activities such as quiz bowl, skillathon and judging, that don’t require you to own a goat.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Katie (VanderKolk) Ockert, 4-H Animal Science Educator
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-432-5270''517-432-5270

Dairy Cattle

Dairying has come a long way since every family had a cow or two! If you want to be part of the dairy industry of the future, you have to prepare yourself for all phases of dairy technology. In a 4-H dairy cattle project, you’ll explore the technology related to the production, manufacturing and marketing of dairy products, and learn about scientific dairy research and related agribusinesses.

Agriculture is a big player in Michigan’s economy and future prosperity—and dairy is an important part of agriculture. Working on 4-H dairy projects could do more than get you a ribbon at the county fair. It could give you a start on a great career!

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or,

Melissa Elischer, 4-H Dairy Educator
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (517) 432-4306

MSU Department of Animal Science
Web: http://www.ans.msu.edu/

Companion Animals

companion animals

Your pet—your dog or cat or bird or even your turtle!—could be the perfect 4-H project for you. You may think you know all there is to know about Fido or Fluffy, but through 4-H, you could learn so much more.

Or how about raising a puppy to become a Leader Dog or a special friend and companion for someone with a disability? It might hurt to give away an animal you’ve worked with so hard, but just imagine how good you’ll feel inside knowing how much you’ve enriched someone else’s life!

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Katie (VanderKolk) Ockert, 4-H Animal Science Educator
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (517) 432-5270

4-H Today

Staff Information & Forms

2014 Theme 4-H Exploration Days

Staff Information and Forms

The following information will be useful to MSU Extension county staff and others helping to prepare 4-H Exploration Days paperwork.

Promotion

Promotional flier and ads are available to counties in both pdf and jpg formats. Fliers can be distributed at meetings. Ads are inserted into newsletters. 2014 info coming soon:

All counties have a copy of the Exploration Days DVD produced in 2008. It contains a promotional segment (for use January through early May) and an orientation segment (for use in June.)

A promotional pre-event news release is also available.

Scholarships

Volunteer Resource People Scholarships

Volunteer session instructors, session helpers and county conference assistants (CCAs) attend free. MSU Extension staff serving as instructors or CCA’s also attend free. County staff attending as session helpers receive an $80 scholarship.

Financial Hardship and New Audience Recruitment Partial Scholarships

Whenever possible, counties are urged to secure local scholarships to support participant attendance.

A limited number of $40 scholarships are available through the State 4-H program for full-time youth participants. Counties may request the scholarships to:

  • Encourage and support participation of financially limited youths who would otherwise not attend.
  • Encourage and support new audience participation at the event.

Application Requirements

Counties request the State 4-H scholarships by mid-February as directed in “4-H Exploration Days Letter #1” emailed to county 4-H staff.  The following information should be included in the request:

  • The number of partial scholarships requested.
  • The situation or rationale for the request (i.e., evidence of financial need, new audience recruitment, the impact of participation upon the individual.
  • The impact this support will have on the individuals.)

Selection Process

Scholarship allocations will be made based on:

  • Rational given in the request letter.
  • The number of scholarships allocated and used by the county in the past 3 years.
  • County attendance level in the past 3 years.
  • The availability of scholarship funds.
  • Notification of scholarship awards will be sent to counties in late February. Counties will receive email notification of the number of scholarships being granted and a scholarship form to complete. The form asks for the name of each recipient and must be returned to the State CYI/4-H office a week after the event registration deadline.

Receiving Scholarship Credit

  • Scholarships are not transferable if a scholarship recipient is unable to attend.
  • Scholarship awards will be deducted from each recipient’s final payment balance.

Registration and Payment Information

The registration book is available online and hard copies are distributed to county MSU Extension offices in early March.

Counties register their participants using a web-based registration program. The registration web site address is http://web2.msue.msu.edu/explorationdays. An email confirmation will be sent back to the county for every registration received. More details are provided in the Registration Data Entry & Confirmation Instructions.

To clarify the fees remittance process, county staff should review Tools and Directions for Tracking Fee Payments. The County Exploration Days Participant Tracking Form is a sample template of what will be available to each county on the registration web site on May 21.

Fee Deadlines, Cancellations & Refunds

$80 Pre-Payment – due upon registration ($90 for youth who are not 4-H members)

  • Fully refundable through May 5.*
  • Non-refundable for cancellations between May 6-June 6.

Fee balance due by June 6 – This is the $85 remaining balance plus any additional fees (such as session fees or early arrival fees) or minus any applicable scholarship credits.

  • Those who cancel June 7 or later will lose $100 of their payment(s). Refunds for the amount paid beyond $100 will be processed in July.*

*Cancellation info must be sent by county staff via email in two steps as soon as possible:

  1. Provide cancellation information (canceller’s name, county, session assignments, date of cancellation) to registration secretary Gloria Ellerhorst at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
  2. Request a refund to MSUE Business Office CYI bookkeeper Judy Lentz-Bishop at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Provide:

  • Participant name and the name of who provided the initial payment and will receive the refund, the date payment was sent to campus via a County MSUE Deposit Transmittal Form and amount paid.
  • Indicate date of cancellation and refund amount. ($80 prepayment is refundable through May 5, $90 for non-4-H’ers. Those who cancel June 7 or later can be refunded all but $100 of their amount paid.) 

Early arrival fees, session fees and scholarship credits do not apply to cancellation/no-show fees.

Buddy System for Participants with Disabilities and Other Special Needs

A buddy system is utilized for youth who have physical, functional or learning disabilities. Some participants with mild disabilities may be able to function on their own without a buddy. This is a decision that each county MSU Extension staff must make with the family based on the situation.

Implementing the Buddy System for Participants with Disabilities and Other Special Needs:

  • Disabled or other special needs participants, who need extra support or assistance to have a positive learning experience, must be accompanied by a same-sex adult or older teen “buddy” who is able to address those special needs.
  • The buddy must accompany the special needs participant to the event, attend the same session and serve as his or her roommate. They will stay together during the entire conference (meals, sessions, free time activities, etc.).
  • The county must also download and complete the 4-H Exploration Days Buddy System for Participants with Disabilities form and indicate who the buddy will be and the disability type and special needs as specifically as possible. Mobility disabilities must be explained so that housing assignments can be based on hall accessibility needs.

County Forms Due May 12 to the State CYI/4-H Office

A number of 4-H Exploration Days forms are needed before housing assignments are made:

Housing Assignments

Three main steps are involved in the process of making housing reservations and assignments:

  1. Each county completes a county delegation house count form (see above) and returns it to the State 4-H office. Counties sharing CCAs must request multi-county housing in the space provided on the form. All forms must be in before any housing assignments can be made!  Please do not be late submitting your completed form!
  2. When all forms are received, the State 4-H staff assigns each county a block of space within a residence hall (based on the house count totals) and sends counties their assignment information (complete with floor plans) by late May.

    Based on the totals indicated on the county house count forms, the State 4-H staff assigns each county two blocks of space (one for males, one for females) within a residence hall. Males and females are housed on different wings of each hall. Since there are generally more female than male participants, however, some females are housed on the top floors of male housing wings.
  3. County 4-H staff make specific room assignments to each member of the delegation. Allowing youth to sign up in pairs or quads for roommates can be done at the county orientation meeting (held the first week of June), or can be handled by whatever process works best in each county.

    Using the floor plans sent from the State CYI/4-H Office, county staff should assign CCAs and chaperones throughout the delegation area. It is the county’s responsibility to provide adequate floor coverage and spacing of CCAs and chaperones throughout the assigned area to promote positive interaction with participants.

Other useful information related to making housing assignments:

  1. If a single block of space is listed with more than one county’s name (sometimes the case for multi-county housing groups), the counties involved must work together to determine which specific rooms each individual delegation should be assigned to within the multi-county housing assignment.
  2. If a room on your housing floor is designated for use by residence hall security staff or some other non-4-H use, it will be listed as such and the county should inform all county chaperones. Security staff are residence hall personnel assigned to their rooms for the entire summer and may be either male or female.
  3. Counties are responsible for assigning the session helpers and instructors that are part of their delegation to specific rooms and for notifying them of their assignments.

Counties complete their housing assignments (and their county housing sheets) through the electronic registration program at <http://web2.canr.msu.edu/explorationdays/login.cfm>.

Click on the green box “Housing Assignments” then:

1. Click on each participant’s name to assign their room based on the dorm rooms assigned to your county’s males and females. The steps are: click on the name, enter the room number, then update the room assignment. Do this for each person.

2. Bed space for each person in the room is designated by a, b, c, or d. The first person assigned to that room will be given bed a, the second will get bed b, etc. Most dorm rooms used for Exploration Days are only 2-person rooms. Do NOT over assign beyond a room’s capacity! Continue to assign rooms until all who need housing are assigned a room and bed space.

  • Holmes and Hubbard Halls (and McDonel Hall when used) usually have a 2 per room capacity.
  • Akers Hall usually has a 4 per room capacity.
  • If your county has been assigned a room with a different capacity than what is standard for that hall, your housing floor plan will show a circled number in the box depicting that room.

Housing Sheets

After counties have made specific room assignments to all members of the delegation, the individual female and male housing sheets can be prepared. At the same electronic registration program site used for assigning individuals to rooms, click on the green box “Reports.” Click on the report named “Participant Housing Sheet” and you’ll have your ready-made forms needed by your CCAs for bed check and by the event HQ staff!

Counties should make a copy of each housing sheet (pink paper for girls; blue for boys is preferred) and provide this to your CCAs for their bed check use. The State 4-H Office will make the pink and blue copies needed for HQ, 4-H Information Center and residence hall staff use.

  • Your housing assignment information should be completed and ready for the event HQ staff use by date identified in your county housing mailing (approx. end of first week of June) .

After all counties have provided their housing assignments, the event HQ staff will export this data into a similar housing form used by the residence halls. Once the HQ begins working with the data to prepare it for the residence halls, counties will not be able to enter or change room assignments.

The information generated from these electronic lists will be used at check-in for room key and floor/cafeteria access card assignments. If an emergency which warrants a room change does occur, a number of steps must occur that will involve the county staff, HQ staff, the county conference assistant and the head conference assistant from your hall’s 4-H Information Center

County Delegation List

Another report you can access via the green “Reports” box on the electronic registration web site is a delegation list. This summary list itemizes your delegation by females and males in alphabetical order. If you find corrections are needed, contact the event registration secretary.

Pre-Event County Orientation Meeting

CCA-Chaperone Pre-Event Orientation Meeting Agenda

Suggested Agenda for County Orientation Meeting: Early June, 1½ Hours

Things to Know  To be copied & distributed to each participant

Stereotype Awareness Activity

Identification Portfolios

Counties will create identification portfolios for their delegation. A Personal Data Sheet with a photo will be created for each youth and adult participant. These sheets will help county conference assistants (CCAs) and chaperones put names and faces together, put all pertinent information in one place and assist with identification and tracking if someone is missing. CCAs or county staff will be the keepers of the County Identification Portfolios.

Whereabouts Schedules

Youth and their assigned adult chaperones need to keep each other informed of where they’ll be, when and with whom. All chaperones will post two schedules on their residence hall room doors. One will show the chaperone’s schedule. The other will be for youth to sign in and out of the recreational activities they attend without a chaperone. The Participants’ Whereabouts Schedule form and the CCA/Chaperone/Staff Whereabouts Schedule form are available for downloading.

Permission Forms Needed by the State 4-H Office

County 4-H staff should submit the completed permission forms for their entire delegation, in alphabetical order, to the State 4-H Office registration secretary between May 13-31. (These forms should be turned in by participants at the same time as their registration form. Do not send forms for participants who have cancelled their registration.) Each form includes the following sections – each with its own signature line:

  • Section 1 – Parent/Guardian Consent (required for all participants under 18 years old)
  • Section 2 – Medical Treatment Authorization
  • Section 3 – Code of Conduct (required for all youth & adults)
  • Section 4 – Media Release (requested for all youth & adults, but not required)
  • Section 5 – 4-H Overnight Housing Permission (required for all youth participants)

Check-In

During check-in, participants receive:

  • Room key
  • Floor/cafeteria conference card
  • Name badge/lanyard
  • Activity Guide
  • Event T-shirt

If your entire county delegation is arriving together, one or more adults may check-in their entire group instead of having each individual stand in line. If you select this option, however, be sure the adults know if anyone has cancelled. Accepting keys and conference cards for those not attending will result in the full fee instead of the reduced cancellation fee.

Tuesday Early Arrivals

All Tuesday early arrivals should be registered as early arrivals. The early arrival registration package covers Tuesday lodging and Wednesday breakfast. Early arrival breakfast will be served in Holmes Hall.  Tuesday dinner is not provided.

All Tuesday early arrival check-in begins in West Holmes Hall outside General Headquarters. From there participants proceed to their assigned residence hall.

The check-in schedule for Tuesday early arrivals is:

4-5 p.m.     Groups that bicycle to the event

5-9 p.m.     Designated time for early arrivals. (Prior arrangements must be made for arrivals after 9 p.m.)

Wednesday Arrivals

Check-in is from 8-11 a.m. in the residence hall on the side to which you are assigned – East, West, North, or South. The first stop will be at the 4-H check-in table. From there everyone proceeds to the residence hall table where keys and conference cards are distributed. The cards allow entry on the housing floors and in the elevators; they also serve as the cafeteria meal card.

Late Arrival Information

Late arrivals begin check-in at their hall’s 4-H Information Center then proceed to the hall reception desk on the side of the hall to which they are assigned. The location of each dorm’s 4-H Information Center is listed in the activity guide.

4-H Information Centers

A 4-H Information Center will be staffed within each residence hall from 7 a.m. to midnight. Each 4-H Information Center is operated by a male and female team of head conference assistants with the help of all county conference assistants within the residence hall. 4-H Information Center locations and telephone numbers are listed in the Activity Guide.

The functions of the 4-H Information Centers are:

  • Housing questions/problems.
  • Provide location directions.
  • Relay messages via a county message baggie system. Plastic baggies are labeled with the names of each county assigned to the respective residence hall. As messages are received, they are written down and inserted into the county’s baggie. CCAs & field staff should frequently check for messages. The see-through baggies makes it easy to tell when someone from a county has a message. (If a message is urgent, effort is made to track down the participant immediately.)
  • Provide basic first-aid supplies.
  • Collect and disperse lost and found items.
  • Replace lost name badges, meal cards, or Activity Guides.
  • Create a “user friendly” atmosphere for participants.
  • Distribute pencils and paper to participants upon request.
  • Assist with questions.

At times the Information Centers are extremely busy; at other times there may be little to do for the Head CAs and CCAs staffing the centers. The activity level of the Information Centers depends greatly on the number of questions and problems that arise.

General Headquarters

General Headquarters is located in the West Holmes Hall Lounge (New for 2014). The telephone number is 517-353‑2922. Headquarters is staffed from 7 a.m. to midnight on Wednesday and Thursday and from 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Friday. If you need help during the night, contact the West Holmes desk receptionist at 517-353-6360. The receptionist will put you in touch with the 4-H Exploration Days program director.

The functions of General Headquarters are:

  • Relay messages from Headquarters to the 4-H Information Centers.
  • Early arrival registration.
  • Session information/problems.
  • Distribution of session supplies, audiovisual materials and signs.
  • Distribution of complimentary meal tickets for instructors not receiving honoraria and volunteer award interview selection committee members.
  • Disciplinary action for severe behavior problems.
  • Transportation to and/or from the hospital if it’s unavailable through a participant’s county.
  • Lost and found items (not hall-specific.)
  • Assist with any and all questions.

At the Event County Meeting

Each county should hold a county delegation meeting after arrival and before sessions start on Wednesday. All participants, chaperones and county staff are expected to be present. Meetings should be chaired by CCAs with assistance from the county staff.

A list of suggested meeting locations will be sent to counties and CCAs in late May in a separate mailing to each. This list is prepared to assure that all delegations will have indoor meeting space available in case of inclement weather. If the weather is good (and hopefully it will be!) the CCA and county staff may choose to have the delegation meet outside.

It will be the responsibility of the CCAs to post notices on the delegation’s housing floor to inform participants of the meeting time and location. CCAs will be provided with paper, markers and tape in the CCA packets they pick up upon arrival.

Suggested County Meeting Agenda – Wednesday, 11-11:30 a.m. or anytime after check-in but before sessions

  • Review Activity Guide, (especially map), session locations, shuttle bus route and field trip loading site.
  • Promote the special entertainment at Wharton Center on Wednesday evening.
  • Review the recreational activities in alphabetical order at the back of the Activity Guide.
  • Discuss participant/staff expectations.
  • Review health care procedures (listed in the beginning of the Activity Guide.)
  • Be sure each participant was issued a key and conference card at check-in. (If not, follow up with hall front desk to obtain.)
  • Remind about missing item fees: $75 keys, $10 conference cards.
  • Answer questions.

Youth/Chaperone Huddles

In addition to the total county meeting held Wednesday morning there will be five youth/chaperone huddles held throughout the event by each chaperone and his or her assigned youth. Youth/chaperone huddles will provide a chance for chaperones and youth to touch bases after sessions, before and after evening activities, before bedtime and just before check out/departure. Youth/chaperone huddles will be held at 4:45 - 5:00 p.m. and 11 - 11:15 p.m. on both Wednesday and Thursday and again at 11:15 - 11:30 a.m. on Friday. Counties may wish to hold a county wide meeting as part of their Thursday afternoon huddle time. Counties may also choose to adjust the times slightly to best fit their needs, and all huddles should end by 11:15 p.m. each night.

Recommended Agenda

  • Youth share how they spent their free time.
  • Process the experiences.
  • Discuss how these experiences can be shared or taught at the local level.
  • Review upcoming activities.
  • Answer questions.
  • Review evaluation, check-out and departure procedures (do this Thursday evening only).
  • It’s preferred that participants complete the evaluation on Friday shortly before departure but it can be done Thursday night instead.

Bed Checks

  • All county participants are to be (1) in their assigned rooms by 11:15 p.m., and (2) quiet by midnight. Chaperones that have participants who wish to go to bed before 11:15 p.m. may hold their huddle meeting before 11 p.m.
  • CCAs and county chaperones are responsible for bed checking their participants using the pink and blue housing sheets. CCAs and county chaperones must account for all county participants each night after curfew, making certain the individuals assigned to each room are in their own rooms and quiet. Participants may not trade rooms once keys have been issued. If an emergency which warrants a room change does occur, the change must be approved by the CCA, and the HCAs must be notified.
  • Participants who are missing must be located before contacting the hall Information Center with an “all accounted for.” If assistance is needed in locating participants not on the floor at curfew, the CCA should contact their county staff person or the HCAs at their 4-H Information Center.
  • When all participants in the county or multi-county delegation are accounted for, the CCA must notify their 4-H Information Center. This should be done as soon as possible after the 11:15 p.m. curfew.
  • CCAs should remain on duty on their floor, along with chaperones, until the entire floor is quiet.
  • When all participants in the hall are accounted for, the Information Center relays this information to General Headquarters and the 4-H Information Center closes for the night.
  • In the morning, participants should not leave their assigned floor any earlier than 6:45 a.m.

Guidelines for Handling Behavior Problems

If behavior problems occur during the event, the following steps should be taken:

  1. If the behavior problem is “minor”, CCA and/or county staff should provide warning and if necessary, provide the discipline they feel is appropriate.
  2. If a problem can not be solved as described above, the advice of the HCAs should be sought. If further counsel is necessary, General Headquarters should be contacted.
  3. The State 4-H staff at General Headquarters recommends that participants be sent home for the following reasons:
    - Theft or vandalism
    - Drugs, alcohol, sex or violence
    - Violation of curfew policy
  4. If it is decided that a participant should be sent home, the parents or guardian will be called and asked to pick up their child as soon as possible. The 4-H member should make the call in the presence of the field staff member and/or CCA. If the 4-H’er is unable to call home, the field staff member should make the call.

Health Care

  1. Medical treatment authorization forms are kept on file in the 4-H Exploration Days Nurse’s Station during the conference. The Nurse’s Station is staffed from 10:30 a.m. Wednesday to 1 p.m. Friday of the event. The service is available to participants at no charge. Participants who become ill or injured should notify their county staff, then report to the event nurse.
  2. If further health care is needed, the nurse will refer the participant to a Lansing area hospital. (The hospital may vary each year depending on where the nurses are from.) If this occurs, a parent should be contacted first if possible, by the child and the CCA or county staff person. A General Headquarters phone can be used for this purpose.
    Transportation should be provided by an adult from the county of the participant needing transportation if at all possible. If the county can not provide its own hospital transportation, the CCA or field staff should contact General Headquarters for 24 hour emergency transportation. An adult from the county of the participant needing hospital care should accompany the participant even if Headquarters provides the transportation. The cost of hospital treatment will be billed to the participant or parents/guardian of participant. Ambulance service is available but the cost will also be billed to the participant’s insurance or family.
  3. The medical treatment authorization form must accompany any participant needing care from the hospital. The nurse will pull the participant’s health form from the file and give it to the adult accompanying the participant. This form needs to be returned to the nurse after the hospital visit. Counties may also wish to make copies of their delegation’s authorization forms and keep them in their County Identification Portfolio along with the Personal Data Sheets.
  4. Anyone needing life or death ambulance transportation will be taken directly to Sparrow Hospital because it is closest to MSU. If the situation does not permit time to see the event nurse, phone 911 for an ambulance; then notify the county staff or CCA and General Headquarters at 517-353-2922. The health form must be pulled from the Nurse’s Station and taken to the hospital.
  5. Insurance Protection - MSU does not carry special accident insurance for participants at 4-H Exploration Days. Counties are urged to provide special coverage for participants during the event. Counties should download and complete the Special Activities Insurance Coverage Form and submit it as a cover sheet to their delegation’s Medical Treatment Authorization forms they forward to the State 4-H office.

Emergencies/Message Relay System

Contact Information

The telephone number for the Event General Headquarters is 517-353‑2922. It’s listed at the bottom of the conference name badges. Headquarters is located in the West Holmes Hall Lounge.

Headquarters is staffed from 7 a.m. to midnight on Wednesday and Thursday and from 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Friday.

If you need help during the night, contact the West Holmes desk receptionist at 517-353-6360. The receptionist will put you in touch with Judy Ratkos, the 4-H Exploration Days program director.

Emergency Procedures

Evacuation procedures and sites are located in the back of the activity guide and housing room doors. CCAs should designate a space for participants to meet in case of evacuation or emergency and let them know where it is during the county meeting.

Green emergency alert phones are on each housing floor. To use, press the 911 button.  If this phone is accidently activated by someone they need to tell the 911 operator that it was done accidently so that the 911 response call is cancelled. These phones should only be used in the case of an emergency!

If there is an area emergency alert such as a tornado warning, it will be announced automatically from the phone’s speaker.

There are no phones in the housing rooms nor are there pay phones anywhere on campus.( If participants bring cell phones to the conference, they need to use them responsibly.) A long distance phone is available in the event Headquarters for emergency use.

Message Relay System

Most messages during the conference are relayed by inserting notes into a clear baggie labeled with the county name. CCAs and field staff should check their county message baggie frequently at the 4-H Information Center in case they or others from their delegation have a message or are needed by other staff or county participants. If the message is urgent, effort will be made to track down the individual.

Check-Out

Check-out time is Friday from 6:15 to 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. All conference participants must be checked out of the residence halls by 2 p.m., when the outside doors are locked.

CCAs will use their copy of the county housing sheets to check off each person’s name as they collect their key and conference card. When all have been collected, the CCA turns these in to the residence hall front desk. Any participant who does not follow these check-out procedures may be billed for missing items if the records do not show these items as being returned.

1. Participants should do the following when leaving their rooms:

  • Check drawers, closets, under bed, in shower for personal belongings.
  • Close all windows, leave blinds open.
  • Remove sheets and pillowcase from bed and towels from bathroom. Sort and place linen in the appropriate pile or bin in the lobby of your assigned floor.
  • Fold blanket and leave on bed with the pillow and mattress pad.
  • Drop garbage bags in compactor on hall floor.
  • Lock door when leaving room.

2. Turn in evaluation to CCA,

3. Return room key and conference card to your CCA.  A fee will be assessed to participants with lost items: $75 for key, $10 for conference card.

After the Event

Itemized Participant List and Fees Summary

Counties will be sent a report that itemizes each participant’s fees along with a County Fund Transfer Form for paying any fee balance.

Lost and Found

Counties should notify the State 4-H office if they are informed of lost items. After the event, the residence hall staff will notify the State 4-H staff of items left behind by participants. Items which can be identified to an owner will be returned to the participant’s county. Remaining items will be inventoried and a composite list will be sent to counties or by email approximately 2 weeks after the event.

Lost and found items not claimed within 1 month after the event will be given to the Salvation Army.

Evaluation

All counties will be asked to complete general event evaluation forms - one for each youth participant and a different form for each adult. CCAs should collect completed evaluations and turn them in to the HCAs. HCAs will turn in all evaluations collected in their residence halls to Headquarters.

Event evaluation results will be compiled and a report sent to county staff and posted on the event web site shortly after the conference.

Local Carryback

Counties are urged to provide encouragement and support to local clubs to utilize and share the skills and knowledge gained at 4-H Exploration Days.

Contact

For more information on 4-H Exploration Days, contact:

Judy Ratkos, Senior Program Leader
Phone: 517-432-7613
Fax: 517-353-4846
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

OR

Laura Potter, Educational Programs Events Coordinator
Phone: 517-432-2963
Fax: 517-353-4846
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

4-H Youth Development
Michigan State University Extension
446 W. Circle Dr., Rm. 240
Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture
East Lansing, MI  48824

Session Information

4-H Exploration Days

Session Information

2014 Theme

See the 2014 session offerings at http://web2.canr.msu.edu/explorationdays/fullsession.cfm.

During the registration period (mid-March – early May), the list is updated daily to reflect current session enrollments and identify full and cancelled sessions.

During the registration period (mid-March to May), the list is updated daily to reflect current session enrollments and identify full and cancelled sessions.

Session Planning Process

For each content area of session offerings (Animal & Veterinary Science, Communications, Environmental Education, etc.) a staff member with 4-H responsibilities serves as Session Contact Person. They work with instructors to determine session needs and enter them into an online database in March.

Only Session Contact People have access to the Session Description/Planning Packet System using their MSUNet ID.

Contact

For more information on 4-H Exploration Days, contact:

Judy Ratkos, Senior Program Leader
Phone: 517-432-7613
Fax: 517-353-4846
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

OR

Laura Potter, Educational Programs Events Coordinator
Phone: 517-432-2963
Fax: 517-353-4846
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

4-H Youth Development
Michigan State University Extension
446 W. Circle Dr., Rm. 240
Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture
East Lansing, MI  48824

4-H Youth Mentoring

Mentor and Mentee activityWhat is mentoring?

Formal mentoring matches caring individuals with young people to provide support, friendship, reinforcement and constructive examples.

Mentoring is also a partnership between the mentor and mentee for the positive development of the mentee. The mentee is not reduced to a recipient role. The mentee is an active participant and decision maker in his or her development. This allows an emotional transaction between them to occur with bonds of mutual trust and respect at the core of each relationship.

What is a mentor?

  • A friend 
    A mentor has time to listen and give thoughtful, caring advice and assistance. He or she is someone who notices the little things and uses simple phrases like “I’m proud of you,” to help build self-esteem of young people. A friend realizes that time is needed to build a relationship; especially if the youth’s past relationships have not been stable ones.
  • A role model
    A mentor is someone who has had successful life experiences and who is willing to share them. Modeling can come at many levels. Some can be as basic and tangible as making a craft, playing a sport or washing the car. Others can be less tangible, but just as important. These might include controlling anger, using good manners, or directing one’s energy in a positive direction.
  • A link to the community
    A mentor should be knowledgeable about the community and be willing to research any information that is unknown to him or her. He or she will teach the young person how to access local resources.

Why do youth need mentors?

Youth need caring, nurturing, open and encouraging people in their lives. It is paramount to their psychological development that youth, especially at-risk and underserved children, have someone in their life to provide positive support to help them realize their potential.

Many youth have a desperate need for enduring contact with positive adult role models. Youth need to be guided, supported, prized and nurtured. Mutual trust, respect and awareness of being valued are key components for an emotional bond to occur between the mentee and mentor.

How does mentoring affect youth?

The intimate connection that can form between the mentor and the mentee helps reinforce positive perceptions of self-esteem and self-worth in youth. Mentoring is a tool for positive youth development. It can help improve grades, develop communication skills, enhance leadership abilities and encourage civic values and participation.

Research indicates:

  • Students who met regularly with their mentors are 52% less likely than their peers to skip a day of school and 37% less likely to skip a class (Tierney & Grossman, 2000).
  • Youth who met regularly with their mentors are 46% less likely than their peers to start using illegal drugs and 27% less likely to start drinking (Tierney & Grossman, 2000).
  • Faith-based mentoring has reduced recidivism rates to 5 to 12% (Prison Fellowship International, 2007).

Types of mentoring offered

4-H Youth Mentoring offers a variety of program models to meet the needs of different communities.  4-H mentoring opportunities in Michigan include:

  • Individual mentoring
    Matches one youth and an older individual. The young person is the focus of this relationship.
  • Group mentoring
    Matches no more than four youth with one adult or older youth to develop a relationship.  This model includes 4-H Tech Wizards.
  • Peer mentoring
    Older youth mentor youth who are three or more years younger.  These matches usually take place at site such as a school or neighborhood center.
  • Community-based mentoring
    These matches meet at a variety of community locations.  Adult mentors and their mentees will participate in activities that may include sports, crafts, museums and other hobbies.
  • Site-based mentoring
    These matches meet regularly at a school or another location in the community. Staff are present to provide guidance and support. 

What is Michigan 4-H Youth Mentoring?

4-H believes all youth need positive, caring, nurturing adults to reach their optimum potential in Head, Hands, Heart and Health. Michigan 4-H Youth Mentoring offers planned mentoring programs for youth aged 5 to 19 that spotlights one-on-one, peer and small-group mentoring models.

Mentoring programs are not new to Michigan 4-H and MSU Extension. 4-H has a long history of establishing and supporting ongoing, positive and nurturing relationships between youth and adults. Michigan 4-H Youth Mentoring utilizes Michigan 4-H Youth Development’s expertise, infrastructure and resources as part of a larger community-based effort.

4-H mentoring programs do not exist to compete with nor take away mentors, mentees or resources from other mentoring or youth development programs. 4-H mentoring programs strengthen mentoring efforts for families, neighborhoods, communities and cities throughout Michigan by extending the resources of Michigan State University Extension to address this important need.

References

Prison Fellowship International. (2007). Communities of Restoration (APAC). Washington, DC. Author. Available at www.pfi.org/programmes/apac.

Tierney, J.P., & Grossman, J.B. (with Resch, N.). (2000). Making a Difference: An Impact Study of Big Brothers/Big Sisters. Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures.

Contact

Lisa Bottomley, Senior Specialist
4-H Youth Development
Phone: 517-432-7622
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Science & Technology

One Million New Scientists. One Million New Ideas. (TM)Science can be defined as the study of the world around us; a thread that runs through all aspects of our lives. Science is the theory that lies behind all 4-H projects. Technology can be defined as the tools and applications of science that help individuals advance their world and their own development. 

The strength of 4-H lies in its strong volunteer base, its emphasis on hands-on experiential learning opportunities, programs that connect learning to real-life situations and its connection to the Land-Grant University system.

The Michigan 4-H science and technology program area cuts across all program and project areas. It is also specific projects in 4-H such as aerospace, computers, small engines, electricity, electronics, astronomy and robotics.

 Visit the National 4-H Council for science education information.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or

Jacob DeDecker, Program Leader
Phone: 517-432-7575''517-432-7575 
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Plants, Soils, & Gardening

Plant ScienceExplore the basics of plants and plant science – plant growth, soils, plant varieties, pest control measures, equipment and gardening techniques – through 4-H plants, soils and gardening projects. Learn about crop and soil sciences wherever you can grow plants, whether that’s in a basket, on a small garden plot or on an acre of land. Discover the magic of the earth and harvest a bushel full of knowledge and experience.

Seeds, Weeds & Garden Reads—Michigan 4-H Gardening & Nutrition Activities for 5 to 8 Year Olds

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Dixie Sandborn, Extension Specialist
Department of Horticulture
Michigan State University
414 Plant and Soil Sciences Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1325
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-355-5191''517-355-5191 Ext. 1404

For more information on the Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden, contact:

Norman K. Lownds, Ph.D., Curator, Michigan 4-H Children’s Garden
Department of Horticulture
Michigan State University
A-240B Plant and Soil Sciences Building
East Lansing MI 48824
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-355-5191''517-355-5191 Ext. 1349

4-H Military Families

OKM Camp

The Partnership

In 1995 the Department of Army and United State Department of Agriculture formed a partnership designed to help Extension/4-H impact new audiences and help the Army meet its mission of providing predictable, consistent youth programs on Army installations worldwide. In the past 15 years, three program components have emerged. The goal of the partnership is to build a strong foundation in our military children and youth so that they possess the necessary life skills to be successful and lead a productive life as well as navigate the special circumstances of being a military connected youth. This is done through hands-on, experiential projects, experiences and opportunties.

The Programs

4-H/Army Youth Development Project The 4-H/Army Youth Development Project (4-H/AYDP) has evolved into a model program of cooperation between Federal agencies. Through the 4-H/AYDP, 4-H National Headquarters and Army Child, Youth and Schools Services (CYSS) partner to provide predictable, quality youth programs and introduce 4-H to Army installations worldwide. The partnership links resources of the Land Grant University Extension System to Army youth programs in pursuit of their common mission for positive youth development experiences for children and youth wherever they live.

Military 4-H Clubs

As Military Families move frequently and experience the difficulties surrounding lengthy and frequent deployments, 4-H provides predictable programming and a safe and nurturing environment for military kids.

National 4-H Headquarters relies upon the Land Grant University Extension System across the country to build strong partnerships with Military Services to provide technical assistance and training for military staff and to establish 4-H Clubs for Military youth living on and off installation. In addition, 4-H seeks to serve those children whose parents are serving in the National Guard and Reserve and live in communities with little or no military presence.

Operation: Military Kids (OMK)

OMK is a collaborative effort with America’s communities to support children and youth impacted by deployment.

Recognizing the skills and knowledge that 4-H is known for, Army CYS Services has partnered with 4-H professionals from around the nation to develop a variety of youth and professional development resources available at: http://www.4-hmilitarypartnerships.org

Military Family Resources

Visit the Resources section on the bottom of this page for materials that can be used to support military families such as:

Check back often as new resources are added monthly!

Where Can I find a 4-H Military Partnership program or event?

All counties have access to the 4-H Military Partnerships program. Michigan State University Extension (MSUE) is divided into 13 districts across the state. To find a program or event near you, visit the MSU Extension Events website or contact the Military State Liaison or 4-H Military Project Director (below) at MSU Extension.

Contact

B’Onko Sadler, Military State Liaison
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (517) 432-7618''(517) 432-7618

Kendra Moyses, 4-H Military Project Director
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (517) 432-7654''(517) 432-7654

Inclusive 4-H

Expanding Inclusive Opportunities for Youth and Volunteers

Today we find a far richer mixture of family backgrounds, ethnic heritages, and physical and mental abilities in our 4-H membership than ever before. This mixture sometimes presents challenges for volunteer leaders and members alike as they learn to function successfully in this larger picture. But what a terrific opportunity we have to blend our talents into positive outcomes.

No one has yet come up with a sure-fire recipe for success in inclusive programming. However, there are some key ingredients in the base of every good mix:

  • Positive attitude
    This begins with the volunteer leader and spreads contagiously to the members.
  • Clear and consistent expectations 
    Establish what is okay today will be okay tomorrow, and doing what is not okay will have defined consequences.
  • Everybody counts
    Communicate that each individual is a valued member of the group and care is taken to recognize and meet each individual’s needs.
  • Adaptation is acceptable
    “That’s the way we’ve always done it” is out. “Let’s see how we can do this to make it work” is in.

Once these key ingredients are in place, the programming possibilities are unlimited. In order to offer 4-H experiences and opportunities to everyone and anyone who wants to be involved, we need to do our best to get rid of any obstacles that might keep 4-H from including everyone.

The best advice for inclusion: Treat every child equally

Ron Morley, 4-H volunteer leader in Clare County and assistant superintendent for special education for the Clare Gladwin Regional Educational Service District, offers these quick tips for volunteers who have opportunities to include young people with disabilities in their 4-H club:

  • When you plan a meeting make sure it is in a space or location that is accessible to everyone.
  • Use your teens. Encourage teen leader pairing so that a child with a disability has someone to work with.
  • All projects should involve everyone. The beauty of the project is in the eye of the beholder - the important thing is that everyone gets to complete the project.
  • One thing a volunteer or club can do is contact the special education department of the local school district. They can be great resources - they have people trained to work with children with special needs.
  • Ask parents about the specific disabilities and needs of a child and offer to accommodate and pay attention to the child’s needs.
  • Encourage team showmanship. This allows a team to bring their individual strengths to the team’s success. It also reduces the emphasis on any team member’s individual abilities or disabilities.

Consider physical environments when programming

When working to make 4-H activities accessible, consider the physical environment. Whether you’re looking for a meeting site that will accommodate a wheelchair user or planning inclusive activities for your 4-H club or group, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Check the accessibility of the building entrances and exits, hallways, rooms, lighting, drinking fountains, safety procedures and other factors.
  • Doorways and walkways should be 32 inches to 36 inches wide.
  • Ramp slopes should not be greater than 1:12.
  • When working around a table, leave a space without a chair to accommodate a person who uses a wheelchair.
  • Keep all walkways free of clutter.
  • Place all supplies and educational materials within reach and convenient to where 4-H’ers will use them. This way, you and the young people don’t have to carry things from place to place.
  • Everyone Shares the Opportunity to Serve

4-H groups that engage in community service give their members a chance to learn what it’s like to help someone else by using their individual abilities. Abilities are found in persons with and without disabilities. Involve 4-H’ers who have disabilities as active participants in your community service projects. Through participating in community service efforts, all 4-H’ers can develop the very qualities that will prepare them to become good citizens and leaders.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Karen Waite, 4-H Youth Equine Specialist
4-H Proud Equestrians Program Coordinator
Michigan State University
1287J Anthony Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824-1111
Phone: 517-353-1748''517-353-1748
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Global & Cultural Education

Labo Japan TripHelping young people to explore and to appreciate what people around the world have in common and what makes them unique is critically important in society today.  Michigan 4-H offers a variety of opportunities for kids and adults to learn more about our global community through:

 “The challenges that face the world today – from global poverty and climate change to financial systems and conflict – require globally minded solutions. Global competency skills are necessary so that young people can invent a future that appropriately addresses global challenges.”
– van Fleet & Winthrop, 2010

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office.

Food, Health & Well-being

food, nutrition and fitness

“My health to better living”

Kids need all the information they can get about their food and fitness options. You can promote nutrition, health and fitness as important parts of a young person’s development. 4-H offers learning opportunities and resources that help kids make healthy food choices, develop their food purchase and preparation skills, create plans for fitness, and prepare and handle food safely.

Health involves the physical, social, intellectual, mental and environmental well-being of young people. Michigan 4-H Youth Development supports and empowers individuals, families and volunteers to help young people make proactive decisions about healthy lifestyles. 4-H links decision-making skill building to current health issues such as tobacco use prevention, stress management, nutrition and fitness to teach youth:

  • Healthy behaviors
  • The science of human diseases
  • Ways to become advocates in their communities to build healthy lifestyles

Through 4-H health programs, young people develop:

  • Positive values such as responsibility and restraint
  • Positive identity and self-esteem
  • Social competencies such as resistance skills, stress management skills and the ability to make healthy lifestyle choices

Get Involved!

  • Start a Natural Helpers program in your school, club or after-school setting.
    This peer helper program is based on the premise that within every group of teens there exists an informal “helping network.” Teens aged 13 to 19 with problems naturally seek out other teens (and adults) whom they trust. The Natural Helpers program trains those informal helpers in the skills they need to more effectively help the young people who seek them out. Since 1991, hundreds of young people and adults have participated in Natural Helpers training.
  • Get involved in youth tobacco prevention.
    Michigan 4-H Youth Development offers a youth tobacco prevention curriculum called “Life’s A Kick! Don’t Start” that provides information and activities designed to encourage young people to make healthy choices about tobacco use. Check out ”Life’s a Kick! Don’t Start” to find ways you can get involved in this very important youth health issue.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

B’Onko Sadler, Associate Program Leader
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 517-432-7618''517-432-7618

International Exchange Programs

International book club reading.

Through 4-H International Exchanges, we hope to increase the friendship between people in Michigan and other countries and to help our young people develop an international outlook. We offer travel programs for youth ages 12 to 26. In addition, Michigan families can host a student from another country in their home for as short as a few weeks or as long as a school year.

For more information about these exciting experiences, see the list of upcoming opportunities below.

4-H Exchange Opportunities

''

Poland Summer Outbound Exchange

Michigan 4-H will be traveling to Poland this year! Travel will be from approximately June 30, 2014 to July 21, 2014. Cost is approx. $2000.00 and open to youth 14 -19 years. Submit completed application, signed participant agreement and a deposit of $750 by April 11, 2014.  Be prepared to take part in a cultural development project and to do presentations on your community when in Poland.  Scholarships are available; complete and submit the  scholarship application.

For more information about this opportunity, visit the Poland Summer Outband Exchange resoure page or contact Insa Raymond at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 517-439-9301.

Japanese Summer Inbound Exchange - LABO

Michigan 4-H will host 25 Japanese youth between the ages of 12 and 15 years and their adult chaperones from July 26 to Aug. 22, 2014.  We hope to identify host families early this year so that they can communicate with the Japanese family several times before their arrival. Applications are due May 1. 

For more information about this opportunity, visit the Japanese Summer Inbound Exchange resoure page or contact Nancy Victorson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 906-293-3203.

''Japanese Summer Outbound Exchange

Michigan 4-H will be traveling to Japan in the summer of 2014!  Applications were due December 15, 2013.  Check back for information on our 2015 summer program.  Scholarships are available, click here for the application. 

For more information about this opportunity, visit the Japanese Summer Outbound Exchange resource page or contact Jan Brinn at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)or 269-673-0370.

School-Year Hosting Programs  - FLEX & LABO
(August 2014 to June 2015)

Michigan plans to host five year-long FLEX (Future Leaders Exchange Program) high school students and two Japanese students between the ages of 15 – 18 for the 2014-15 school year. The students are generally juniors or seniors in high school. Countries participating in the FLEX program include: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Ukraine.

For more information about hosting a young person through this opportunity, visit the School Year Hosting Programs resource page or contact Heather Gray at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 517-355-2361.

''

International 4-H Youth Exchange  - IYFE

Formerly the International Farm Youth Exchange, this program brings college-age youth from abroad to live and work at Michigan farms for the summer. Youth stay at each farm for three weeks. During the summer of 2014, host families are needed for two students, one from Sweden and one from Switzerland.  Scholarships of up to 50% are available for Michigan youth traveling abroad.

For more information about this opportunity, visit the International 4-H Youth Exchange resource page or contact Heather Gray at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 517-355-2361.

Why take part in an international travel experience?

Young people who participate in 4-H international travel opportunities:

  • Develop an appreciation of the social, economic, political and cultural contributions of other countries.
  • Better understand how culture influences values, beliefs and attitudes.
  • Live with host families and actively participate in family life.
  • Practice foreign language, verbal and nonverbal communication skills.
  • Participate in an educational tour to acquire specific subject matter skills and knowledge.
  • Prepare to share the international experience through presentations in their home community.

4-H students arrives in Poland

What participants have to say:

  • “We are having a great time hosting. When we take our Japanese student someplace we find we see things we thought we knew through different eyes, his.” -Host mother for Japanese delegate
  • “What I liked best about this experience was gaining a Polish sister and learning about the culture.” - Polish delegate host sister
  • “With whatever career I choose I will be honest and respectful to everyone. That is what I learned.” - Delegate to Japan 
  • “We are not All-American anymore, because a wonderful blend of real German, Swedish, Swiss and Taiwanese habits has flavored our communications.” - IFYE host family
  • “My children who hosted and traveled continue to keep in touch with their host brothers in Japan and Belize. They have continued interest in other countries and cultures.” - Host mother 
  • “At school, the geography classes are more interesting because we can find more countries on a map and know what life is like in other places.” - IFYE Host Sister

Host Family Information

Host families typically include a young person of the same gender and age as the visitor. International visitors usually are with families from three to five weeks, with the exception of some year-long stays. In addition to training and orientation opportunities, parents of host families are asked to participate in the MSU Extension Volunteer Selection Process, which is required of all 4-H volunteers and professional staff who spend significant amounts of time with young people aged 18 and under.

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Heather Gray, 4-H International Exchange Coordinator

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

517-355-2361

Shooting Sports

ArcheryGet kids on target through the 4-H Shooting Sports Program! 

The Michigan 4-H Shooting Sports program has been active for over 20 years. Youth in more than 70 counties participate in a variety of shooting sports areas every year! Members can learn safety and shooting techniques for shotgun, rifle, air gun, muzzle loading and archery. They learn how to handle firearms responsibly for target practice and hunting and learn respect for the natural environment.

Objectives

The goal of all 4-H Youth Development programs is youth development. All project areas work toward developing skills youth need to be productive and positive adults in society. Decision making, teamwork, problem solving, being responsible and having high self-esteem are just a few of the many skills 4-H helps to develop. 

Objectives specific to the 4-H Shooting Sports program are to:

  • Encourage participation in environmental and outdoor education programs by exposing youth to shooting, hunting and other related activities.
  • Support youth in developing valuable conservation and natural resources related knowledge, skills and stewardship.
  • Enhance development of self-concept, character and personal growth through safe, educational and socially acceptable involvement in shooting.
  • Teach safe and responsible use of firearms and archery equipment.
  • Promote the highest standards of safety, sportsmanship, ethical behavior, and conservation.
  • Strengthen families through participation in lifelong recreational activities.
  • Provide hands-on learning experiences.

Upcoming Events

2014 MI 4-H State Shooting Sports Tournament: August 9, 2014 at Blue Water Sportsman’s Association in St. Clair County near Port Huron, MI

  • T-shirts will be for sale on site in a variety of sizes, colors, & styles that can be custom made for you!  Be sure to check it out!
  • Concessions are available on the grounds for purchase sponsored by the local St Clair County 4-H Shooting Sports Committee.  The menu includes: Breakfast - Juice, muffins, doughnuts, water & Lunch - Hot Dogs, Chips, Pop, Water, Candy Bars & Root Beer Floats.  Please support them!
  • Volunteers are needed!  Contact Nick Baumgart .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

2015 MI 4-H Shooting Sports Instructor Certification Workshop, April 24-26, 2015

2015 National 4-H Shooting Sports Invitational
More information coming soon.

Get Involved

4-H Members

In each 4-H shooting sports discipline, all youth learn basic skills and shoot under the direct supervision of a certified instructor/4-H leader for that discipline.

  • Local 4-H Shooting Sports clubs are open to all youth ages 9 to 19.
  • Archery or BB Gun can be appropriate for ages 7 and 8 with one on one adult direct supervision at the discretion and authorization of a certified shooting sports instructor.

To find a group in your area visit your county MSU Extension office or check out upcoming 4-H Shooting Sports events. All 4-H shooting sports members must have a Parental Permission Form completed and on file with their County MSU Extension office

Adult 4-H Volunteers

4-H Shooting Sports Instructors
All 4-H Shooting Sports clubs are supervised by certified 4-H Shooting Sports Instructors. Certification workshops are held throughout the year in various locations in addition to the state training at the Kettunen Center in April. (For information on becoming a 4-H Shooting Sports Certified Instructor, please visit 4-H Volunteer Job Description: 4-H Shooting Sports Instructor and Michigan State 4-H Shooting Sports Instructor Certification and Recertification Policies and Application.) Instructor manuals are distributed at the 4-H Shooting Sports Instructor Training Workshops. This is the only place to obtain an instructor manual. 

Visit the Federal Youth Ammunition Program Order Update and Information Letter for 2012 -2013 information.

How can ‘non-certified’ volunteers help out?

Safe shooting sports programs require a lot of support from adult volunteers. There are many ways to help out — your certified instructor can provide you with additional information. Contact your county MSU Extension office or find a local club in your area and don’t be afraid to ask how you can help!

Support 4-H Shooting Sports

Partners include:

  • Organizations wanting to expand youth development through conservation education such as hunting and shooting sports
  • Sportsman’s clubs willing to share their space with local groups

Sponsors: 

Assistance from individuals or organizations is welcome and critical to our mission. To donate, please contact the Michigan 4-H Youth Foundation. The following organizations have provided crucial funding support to youth shooting sports programs so they remain accessible to all youth in Michigan:

Follow Michigan 4-H Shooting Sports On Facebook

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Nick Baumgart, Extension Educator
Environmental & Outdoor Education & Shooting Sports
Michigan State University Extension
527 Stephenson St.
Norway, MI 49870
Phone: 906-774-0363''906-774-0363
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Outdoor Adventure Challenge

4-H ChallengeThe 4-H Outdoor Adventure Challenge uses the biggest classroom available — the outdoors — to lead young people in activities that are both physically and mentally stressful. Through 4-H Outdoor Adventure Challenge, participants learn canoeing, kayaking, backpacking, hiking, outdoor survival and safety skills. Most importantly, they learn to communicate with other group members to plan, organize and conduct their own activities in the outdoors. The program teaches youth the skills necessary to deal with stressful situations which may occur in any setting in their lives. It also gives young people a greater sensitivity, understanding and appreciation for both themselves and the outdoors.

Training Requirements

The multi-session 4-H Outdoor Adventure Challenge Leader Training Series is designed to train adults interested in using the outdoors to help develop life skills in young people.

New in 2013 the program has been restructured into OAC Leader Requirements. The training includes an introduction to 4-H and the 4-H Outdoor Adventure Challenge program, training in backpacking, caving, canoeing, kayaking, rock climbing and winter camping. Adults receiving the training are expected to work with young people in the 4-H Outdoor Adventure Challenge program and abide by these 4-H OAC program policies. A number of resources exist to support trainees and those already certified. They are listed in the Resources section below.

You must be at least 16 to enroll in the training, and at least 21 to become a certified 4-H Outdoor Adventure Challenge leader. Enrollment is due a couple weeks before each training date

Training Costs

The fees for training cover instructional materials, facilities or camping fees and group equipment costs and mileage for instructors. Fees are due before each training and must be remitted with a training enrollment form (below).  Participants also are responsible for the cost of their own food, personal equipment, transportation to and from the training sites, and other personal costs.

Promotional Materials

Contact

For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

Nick Baumgart
527 Stephenson St.
Norway, MI 49870
906-774-0363''906-774-0363
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Michigan 4-H Youth Conservation Council

2012 M4-HYCC Senate Presentation

Become a Council Member!

Work with other teens to provide important leadership for conserving Michigan’s natural resources!

Find out more by downloading these materials:

Dates for 2014 are:

  • January 11-12: The council members will choose their topic.  There is a lot of discussion and debate about what is the most important issue to take up this year.  The workshop also includes research skills.
  • February 15-16: In this workshop council members will delve more deeply into their topic by speaking to experts in the subject area.  This workshop also includes games on the public policy process and leadership.
  • March 22-23: Student will focus on completing their research paper and presentation.  Participants will practice communication and public speaking skills.
  • April: date TBA.  The group will present to the Michigan Senate Committee on Natural Resources, Environment, and Great Lakes

The Michigan 4-H Youth Conservation Council (M4HYCC) offers:

  • A leadership and confidence-building opportunity for youth ages 13 to 19.
  • Acquisition of important life skills, experiences, knowledge and understanding of current environmental issues.
  • A chance to explore solutions to environmental issues and provide “youth voice” in state government public policy-making.
  • Exposure to a number of career possibilities and mentoring from caring adults.
  • Life-long benefits for teens as future community leaders and stewards of Michigan’s natural resources. 
  • New friendships with others from across Michigan.

    The program selects up to 25 youth from around the state in the fall of each year.  The youth that apply for M4-HYCC typically have an interest in natural resources, environmental problems, outdoor recreation and/or politics.

    Download a promotional MS PowerPoint presentation for more information about M4-HYCC. Use it to promote M4-HYCC in your county! 

    Information About the Work of the Council:

    See photos of the 2012 M4-HHYCC presentation to the Senate Committee of Natural Resources Environment and Great Lakes.  

    You can find out more about the current activities of the Michigan 4-H Youth Conservation Council at www.m4hycc.org

    Ricky Tanis, a second year member (2007-2009) from Lapeer County talks about his M4-HYCC experience:  ”When I first joined the council, I wasn’t really sure what to expect, but once I arrived, I found out that being a part of M4-HYCC was a chance to be with other teenagers like me, who want to make a difference in today’s world.  Everything we did, we worked together and helped each other out.  We would talk, work, research and of course, laugh together, making everything we did, whether in work or play, enjoyable.”

    Making a Difference

    M4-HYCC was created by the Michigan Senate in 1999 and is coordinated by Michigan 4-H Youth Development.  Each year M4-HYCC members select and research a current environmental issue. They interview people, listen to presentations by professionals, surf the Internet, and read books and articles on the chosen topic. Around Earth Day (April 22) each year, council members testify about their research before a Michigan legislative committee. Their intensive research and testimony have made a difference:

    1. In 2008, they influenced the passing of SB (senate bill) 152 and 362 by giving testimony to both the House and Senate Committees. This public policy was signed by the governor as Michigan law to significantly reduce the amounts of phosphorus permitted in dishwasher and laundry detergents.  High levels of phosphorus in Michigan lakes and rivers have had harmful effects on wildlife and people.  
    2. In 2003, their recommendations led to the introduction of a bill in the state Senate that directed the Michigan Department of Natural Resources to include information in its boating safety course on proper marine fueling techniques, the problems that marine fuel spills may cause to lakes and rivers, and how and where to report a marine fuel spill.
    3. M4-HYCC members testified for a bill introduced in 2000 (and passed in 2002) that promoted the development of the Michigan heritage water trail program.

    We invite you to make a difference through involvement in M4-HYCC or a county-based 4-H youth conservation council!

    It’s a Winner!

    M4-HYCC is an award-winning program! It has been awarded:

    • 2005 Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Youth Environmental Award
    • 2004 Michigan State University Extension John Hannah Award for Program Excellence
    • 2004 Sea World/Busch Gardens/Fujifilm Environmental Excellence Award
    • 2003 Michigan Senate White Pine Award for Environmental Excellence

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Darren Bagley, Extension Educator
    605 N. Saginaw St., Suite 1A
    Flint, MI 48502
    Phone: 810-244-8515''810-244-8515
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Nick Baumgart, Extension Educator
    Environmental & Outdoor Education & Shooting Sports
    Michigan State University Extension
    527 Stephenson St.
    Norway, MI 49870
    Phone: 906-774-0363''906-774-0363
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 906-774-0363''906-774-0363

    Junior Citizen Planner

    Teens planningIn order to make a long-term impact on land use, today’s youth and tomorrow’s leaders must be equipped with effective land-use decision-making tools. The Junior Citizen Planner (JCP) program is a series of innovative curricula that educates youth in 3rd to 8th grades on land use issues through fun, hands-on learning activities within their communities. It was developed through a joint effort between MSU Extension’s Citizen Planner Program and 4-H Youth Development.

    It is modeled after the successful, adult Citizen Planner program.

    The Junior Citizen Planner curriculum utilizes group activities. These activities can be conducted within several settings including: school classrooms, 4-H Clubs, after-school programs, home schools, Scouts, Campfire, or day and summer camps. Flexibility is a key component of this program.

    Target Audience, Skills and Curriculum

    Junior Citizen Planner targets youth in the classroom and 4-H Club setting but may also be used with day and summer camp programs, Scouts, Campfire, and other youth programs. The program develops participant’s skills in becoming good citizens, responsible decision-makers and will develop community pride. The primary subject areas covered in the program are:

    • Social Studies, Civics and Community
    • Geography
    • Environmental Science and Land Use Planning
    • Land Use Technology (GIS, GPS)

    Activities are posted in PDF format under the “Resources” section at the bottom of this page. The activities have been certified to meet both, the Michigan Curriculum Framework Content Standards and Benchmarks, as well as the Kent County Core Curriculum for 3rd - 5th grades, however, the activities are appropriate for participants up to age 13 (8th grade). The activities are not specific to Kent County, they are relevant on a statewide basis.

    Benefits to Educators and Youth:

    • Fun and creative teaching strategies and learning methods, including experiential and hands-on components.
    • Easy to follow materials and flexible lesson plans.
    • Activities / lesson plans meet the Michigan standards and benchmarks and are listed by their numerical code and written out completely.
    • An unbiased introduction to controversial land use issues, presenting all sides of an issue in a fair and honest manner.
    • Activities that build knowledge and skills for inquiry, investigation, analysis, decision-making and action.
    • Projects that can be displayed at fairs, in a class celebration or for guest speakers.
    • Evaluation strategies directed toward a variety of learning styles that assess student learning.
    • Adaptation ideas and technology extensions on activities to further student understanding and investigation.
    • Background information, additional data, facts resources and reference material for each lesson plan.

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Nick Baumgart
    527 Stephenson St.
    Norway, MI 49870
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 906-774-0363''906-774-0363

    4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp

    4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp

    Go charter fishing, snorkeling or sailing! Hike through forests! Wade through wetlands! Explore dunes! These are just a few of the exciting activities you can do at 4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resources Camp.

    Come to camp this summer! 

    If you want to have fun and amazing outdoor hands-on learning experiences, come to the week-long adventure known as 4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp.

    When and where is camp?

    4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resources CampAugust 2 – 8, 2015, at a place called Camp Chickagami in Presque Isle, near the shores of Lake Huron between Alpena and Rogers City. The state-licensed camp has dormitory-style cabins, a dining hall, and toilet and shower facilities. Meals are all prepared by a qualified cook and served right in the dining hall.

    Who should attend?

    Camp is for teens aged 13 to 15, or going into 8th-10th grades in the fall. (We use the public school cut-off date for school-year eligibility which is that 2015 campers must be born before 12/01/2002 to be entering 8th grade in the fall.)  You don’t need to be a 4-H member to attend. There are a limited number of spaces at GLNR Camp, so apply early to increase your chances of getting a spot. Promotional materials and applications will be available in February.

    It’s a winner!

    It’s an award winner, but that just tells you it’s full of good stuff taught by experts. More important to teens, it’s full of fun too and things that’ll make you feel good to be doing your part to care for Michigan’s environment. Learn more by reviewing the one-page 2014 Impact Summary and the 2014 Full Evaluation Report. To learn more about how this state-licensed camp is managed, review the Policies and Procedures Manual and the Health Service Policy Manual.

    To learn why this camp is one of the top 4-H science programs in the nation, check out the new report, “Priming the Pipeline: Lessons from Promising 4-H Science Programs,” from a study conducted as part of the national 4-H Science Initiative evaluation. The report features 4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp and seven other nationally recognized 4-H science programs. Program practices are discussed in the following areas: youth outreach and recruitment; staff and science volunteers; professional development; science curricula and pedagogy; youth development and attitudes toward science; partner organizations and resource support; program evaluation; and program sustainability and scale-up.  

    At 4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp, you can:

    It's A Winner!

    • Enjoy all of the usual fun camp activities, but also learn about science in interesting, hands-on ways (yes, it’s OK to learn during the summer).
    • Learn about our Great Lakes and the issues they face. You’ll know about environmental concerns and how to be a good environmental steward to protect our state’s great natural resources.
    • Get off the couch and get more into the outdoors. You might even discover a career you’d like to pursue!
    • Become a better leader, discovering self-confidence you never knew you had.

    Related Programs

    Camp Chickagame in Presque Isle County4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resources Camp is just one of many 4-H environmental and outdoor education program offerings. For more information, please visit the Environmental and Outdoor Education section of this site.

    For information about the pre-college programs offered at MSU, please visit Spartan Youth Programs at http://www.spartanyouth.msu.edu. You’ll find a multitude of programs that can help you develop valuable skills, make new friends and taste college life. 

    Sponsors and Partners

    4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resources Camp is sponsored by:

    Contact

    Judy Ratkos, Senior Program Leader
    Phone: 517-432-7613
    Fax: 517-353-4846
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Laura Potter, Educational Programs Event Coordinator
    Phone: 517-432-2963
    Fax: 517-353-4846
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Nick Baumgart, Extension Educator
    Environmental & Outdoor Education & Shooting Sports
    Michigan State University Extension
    527 Stephenson St.
    Norway, MI 49870
    Phone: 906-774-0363
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Entomology

    Collecting insectsTake some time to learn about our small, successful insect neighbors. After all, there are many more of them than there are of us!

    You can do service-learning projects related to insects; observe, photograph and collect insects (either by using catch-and-release methods or by making a specimen collection); and more! Read on, and have fun going “buggy!”

    Service Learning and Entomology

    • Emerald Ash Borer Eradication – Get involved with the effort to wipe out the emerald ash borer! You and other Michigan 4-H’ers can help spread the word about the importance of not moving firewood from quarantined areas. You can also help others identify this invasive species and help identify infested ash trees. To learn more visit http://www.emeraldashborer.info/. You can also download a “Help Stop the Emerald Ash Borer” informational Flier.
    • Purple Loosestrife Eradication– Rear the beetles that love to munch on purple loosestrife, an invasive species that is crowding native plants out of Michigan wetlands. Visit the Michigan Sea Grant “Purple Pages” at http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/pp/index.html to find out how.

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Nick Baumgart, Extension Educator
    Environmental & Outdoor Education & Shooting Sports
    Michigan State University Extension
    527 Stephenson St.
    Norway, MI 49870
    Phone: 906-774-0363''906-774-0363
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Environmental & Outdoor Education

    Aquatic ExplorationJourney through field, forest, wetlands and urban areas to discover the wonders and mysteries of Michigan’s natural environment. Through 4-H environmental and outdoor education projects you will learn about the interconnection of people and nature. You’ll also develop respect and appreciation for and a sense of stewardship toward our natural resources. Enjoy time outdoors and develop an understanding and appreciation of the environment through three core theme areas:

    • Basic science and ecology
    • Interrelationships and impacts
    • Health, wellness and positive outdoor experiences

    The following 4-H EOE project areas incorporate these themes into their learning activities:

    Awards, Contests, Grants & Career Preparation Opportunities

    Opportunities related to 4-H Environmental and Outdoor Education abound! For more information check 4-H Environmental & Outdoor Education Awards, Contests, Grants & Career Preparation Opportunities listing for 2014.

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Nick Baumgart, Extension Educator
    Environmental & Outdoor Education & Shooting Sports
    Michigan State University Extension
    527 Stephenson St.
    Norway, MI 49870
    Phone:  906-774-0363''906-774-0363
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Community Service & Learning

    Service ProjectThrough its pledge of “hands to larger service,” 4-H has historically given back to the community by encouraging young people and adults to volunteer. In 4-H, service is commonly defined as the voluntary action of an individual or a group of individuals without pay. Service to the community – through food drives, raking the yard of an elderly neighbor, adopt-a-highway programs, teens teaching younger youth, teens mentoring children or youth determining community needs and helping solve community problems – helps young people learn caring, leadership and citizenship.

    “Every year millions of Americans volunteer at more than one million non-profit organizations throughout the United States.”
    (Volunteering: 101 Ways You Can Improve the World and Your Life, by Douglas M. Lawson. Alti Publishing, 1998) 

    Why is it important for all of us to be involved in service?

    Our U.S. society is based on the idea that we are all responsible for the well-being of our community, country and world. Even before the founding of our country, the willingness to serve was evident in the hearts of many. Later the Great Depression brought out opportunities for service throughout the nation, and the forming of the Peace Corps in 1960 by President John F. Kennedy further reinforced the eagerness of citizens to get involved in helping others. While the people served certainly benefit from community service, the volunteers who engage in serving others benefit positively in many ways. Michigan 4-H Youth Development continues in that tradition by involving young people in a variety of community service-learning projects and programs.

    What youth gain from community service learning

    By giving back to their communities, young people can:

    • Learn the value of helping others.
    • Develop leadership, communication, organizational skills and a sense of empowerment.
    • Learn how important the connection is between subject matter and life in the community.
    • Learn how to cooperate with one another and work as a team with diverse groups of people including adults, peers and others with different backgrounds and experiences.
    • Succeed in an area different from academics, athletics or popularity.
    • Build self-esteem from the positive results of their service.
    • Develop problem-solving and decision-making skills by applying their knowledge to real-world situations.
    • Develop a sense of being responsible for their community and a sense that citizenship requires them to actively participate in their community.
    • Receive recognition for their efforts and possibly college scholarships.
    • Experience the world of work.

    Not only do young people gain by being involved in community service, the clubs and groups that they are in also experience benefits from planning and carrying out service projects.

    What clubs gain from community service learning

    Carrying out service activities can strengthen a club or group because it:

    • Boosts member commitment and involvement by giving members meaningful activities.
    • Can involve families and youth in a joint activity.
    • Fulfills the “hands to larger service” part of the 4-H pledge.
    • Builds unity among members, allowing them to function better as a team.
    • Allows members to get to know one another better as they work together on a common goal.
    • Helps youth become invested in their club and community.
    • Shows the community how youth can be resources and how they can get things done. 

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    4-H Youth Development
    Phone: 517-432-7575''517-432-7575
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Communications

    public speakingExpress yourself! Having great communications skills can make a big difference in life and work. The ways we communicate, as young people and adults, touches all that we do. In 4-H activities, you will have the opportunity to gain skills and confidence in areas such as public speaking, writing, visual communication, video and media.

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Julie Chapin, Ph.D., Program Leader
    Phone: 517-432-7608
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Clothing & Textiles

    Appearances do make a difference! When people look their best, they feel confident and do their best. You can help kids look great and feel great by teaching them the essentials of personal appearance; the importance of body image, clothing designs, fabric facts, how to build a wardrobe and be a smart buyer. You don’t have to know how to sew to be involved in the 4-H clothing and textiles projects!

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Julie Chapin, Ph.D., Program Leader
    Phone: 517-432-7608
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Leadership & Citizenship

    Change the world. Change your community.

    4-H'ers in Washington D.C.You’ve heard the expression “think globally, act locally.” Michigan 4-H couldn’t agree more. Discover the many ways to get involved in your community and act locally through our educational activities, fun conferences and events that help develop leadership and citizenship skills. Young people (5 to 19 years old) are invited to join 4-H and gain the knowledge, skills and practical application needed to be participatory members of our democracy, learn job skills and have fun. Programs and 4-H Clubs are done through a cadre of trained volunteers and staff who work with young people on dynamic and meaningful educational programs.

    Through citizenship, leadership and community service learning activities, young people learn how their actions (such as voting, participating in community service activities, writing letters to their legislators and taking action on an issue important to them) can help them understand how to make a difference. In the process, they learn life skills, understand themselves, learn to learn, communicate better, make positive decisions and learn to get along and work well with both youth and adults.

    Michigan 4-H is proud to be a leader in citizenship, leadership & service!

    Through the following goals, young people experience citizenship, leadership and service in the context of positive community youth development. 4-H citizenship, leadership and community service learning programs:

    • Meet the needs of youth by developing fun and relevant experiences designed by youth and adults.
    • Use a variety of research-based learning processes and resources to engage youth in a variety of hands-on activities.
    • Involve youth and adults as partners existing at all levels of program design, implementation and evaluation and through shared knowledge and activities have reciprocal leading, teaching and mentoring roles.
    • Recognize the value of volunteer and professional staff and support them through a well-coordinated system of professional development opportunities.
    • Communicate the outcomes of programs to local communities, legislators and other stakeholders.
    • Seek out charitable grants and public funding to support citizenship, leadership and service programming in 4-H.

    4-H Leadership

    Teen leadershipLeadership skills can be learned and developed through the many opportunities 4-H has to offer. 4-H’ers learn about leadership and practice those skills through activities such as taking part in 4-H club meetings, presenting information at various events, designing and implementing activities for younger youth and carrying out community service projects as individuals or with a group. 4-H teaches youth the life skills necessary to effectively lead others. These important life skills will be used in jobs, in careers, in service clubs, in communities and in daily activities as an adult.

    By taking part in 4-H, young people can acquire the leadership life skills they need to take responsibility for their actions and to work with others in achieving individual and group goals. In a 4-H leadership project, youth gain experience in understanding themselves, communicating, getting along with other, learning to learn, making decisions and managing and working with group.

    The 4-H Teen Leadership Project

    An excellent way for 4-H’ers to discover what makes a leader successful is to become involved with a 4-H teen leadership project. 4-H teen leaders doing a 4-H teen leadership project can choose to take on a leadership role defined by themselves and their chosen adult advisor, which involves more responsibility, time and work. 4-H teen leaders who have been involved in developing their leadership skills for some time can expand their experience by taking on a specific project. The 4-H teen leadership project allows teens to actively participate in project planning, become involved in leadership tasks, and help younger 4-H members learn by example. 4-H teen leaders who are involved in a 4-H teen leadership project have different requirements and complete the 4-H Teen Leadership Project Guide, which allows teens to discuss and reflect upon their project plan and project goals. 4-H offers opportunities for 4-H teens to become leaders by practicing the skills they are learning. See the 4-H Teen Leadership publication to learn more.

    New Curriculum Published!

    4-H Backpack to Adventure: Youth Leaders in a Global World is an innovative, competency-driven and research-based curriculum from Michigan State University Extension. It is designed for adult and teen volunteers, parents, professionals and others to use in working with young people aged 9 to 19 to develop the knowledge and skills they need to become youth leaders in an interconnected, global environment.

    The learning activities are appropriate for use in nonformal educational settings such as 4-H clubs and groups, after-school and out-of-school programs, home school classes, school enrichment programs and camps.  The activities can also be used in classrooms. 

    Unique featuresBackpack to Adventure logo of this flexible curriculum include:

    • The “4-H Backpacks to Adventure” that young people create either on their own or in teams.
    • A focus on five competencies (5Cs) that young people will need to become leaders – locally and globally – in a globalized, rapidly changing and interconnected world. The 5Cs are character, citizenship, communication, creativity and culture.
    • A “Resource Matrix” that shows which of the 5Cs are addressed in each activity and that links to many more learning opportunities.
    • The activities are matched to the 2010 National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies.

    You don’t have to be a leadership or international studies expert to work with young people using this curriculum.  For more information about using this curriculum, including information about upcoming trainings, contact .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).  The curriculum is available in either print or electronic format from the MSU Extension Bookstore

    “The challenges that face the world today – from global poverty and climate change to financial systems and conflict – require globally minded solutions. Global competency skills are necessary so that young people can invent a future that appropriately addresses global challenges.”
    – van Fleet & Winthrop, 2010

    Advisory Group Materials

    Sample Bylaws:

    Other Resources

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Jackie Martin, Leadership and Civic Engagement Work Group Co-Chair
    Phone: 734-222-3877''734-222-3877
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Brian Wibby, Leadership and Civic Engagement Work Group Co-Chair
    Phone: 906-475-5731''906-475-5731
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Character Education

    Parents, teachers, 4-H volunteers and others who work with and on behalf of young people and families can become involved in character education.

    What is Character Education?

    Character education is the process of learning common attitudes, beliefs and behaviors that are important for people to have as responsible citizens. Good character education can provide ground rules for life for adults and young people, and it stresses the importance of helping children learn and practice behaviors that reflect universal ethical values.

    Character education helps children and youth become:

    • Conscious of the right thing to do.
    • Committed to doing the right thing.
    • Competent in doing the right thing.

    Why Character Education?

    Many people are concerned about the breakdown in the healthy moral development of children. Increases in delinquency, pregnancies, violence and substance abuse continue to climb among adolescents. Surveys have shown astonishingly high levels of cheating, lying, stealing and drunken driving among teens and young adults. Adults clearly need to do a better job of teaching and modeling high standards of behavior in the family, school and community.

    Character education is important in every aspect of a child’s life, including the family, school and community. Kids need consistent messages, and they need all the adults in their lives to have high standards and expectations for ethical behavior. Character education can and should happen as a long-term, communitywide, community-based effort involving schools, parents, social service agencies, law enforcement, churches, businesses, 4-H, and other youth and family organizations.

    Character education endeavors fit well with a policy adopted by the Michigan State Board of Education in October 1996, in which the board encouraged public schools to provide character education focusing on principles such as respect, responsibility, caring, trustworthiness, justice, civic virtue and citizenship. These themes also complement much of the content of the Michigan Model Health Education Curriculum used in school districts across the state.

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Michigan 4-H Youth Development
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 517-432-7575''517-432-7575

    Poultry

    Poultry Clinic ParticipantWhy did the chicken cross the road? To get to a gentleman on the other side. When the chicken asked, “What’s your name?” the gentleman replied, “Bond. James Bond. What’s yours?” The chicken responded, “Ken. Chic Ken.”

    Seriously, if you’ve ever pondered the question of which came first, the chicken or the egg, you’ll have the chance to try to discover the answer when you participate in a 4-H poultry project. If chickens aren’t your style, you could try turkeys, ducks, geese, pheasants, pigeons or coturnix (Japanese quail).

    Come on! Don’t be a chicken! Be a good egg and give it a try!

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Katie (VanderKolk) Ockert, 4-H Animal Science Educator
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 517-432-5270

    Visual Arts

    visual artsExpress yourself through creative art projects! Have fun while gaining skills and confidence by drawing, painting, taking photos, working with wood or making crafts. 4-H visual arts includes crafts, fine arts, photography and woodworking.

    4-H Children’s Art Exchange with China

    Kindergartners to sixth graders are invited to send “visual letters” to children their own age in China. Teaching kits are available to facilitate teaching about both China and making art. For more information, check out the Michigan 4-H China Project and the online exhibit, “Visual Letters–The Art of Michigan Children.” 

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office

    Performing Arts

    performing arts, clowningExpress yourself creatively with a 4-H performing arts project! 4-H performing arts includes clowning, dance, drama and music.

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office

    Folkpatterns

    Folkpatterns workshopIf you’re interested in traditions, history, traditional crafts, foods or your own heritage, the 4-H Folkpatterns program is for you! Discover the traditions in your life and in the lives of others. Connect with tradition-bearers in your community. Explore food traditions, stories and customs of family members. Grow a heritage garden. Learn a folk dance. Document the historic barns in your community. Study the art of gravestone symbols. Research your family tree. Interview  a former 4-H’er for the Michigan 4-H History Project. Hold an ethnic dinner. Discover how culturally diverse every community is!

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office

    4-H China Project

    Michigan 4-H China ProjectThe Michigan 4-H China Project, conducted in cooperation with the People’s Republic of China, is a global education program that often uses the arts for both in-school and after-school learning experiences. More than 300,000 Michigan youth have participated in this project. Michigan K-to-6th-graders can:

    • Learn of the many similarities between their lives and the lives of their counterparts halfway around the world
    • Gain a sense of being part of one world, whether they live in Michigan or in Shandong Province
    • Have a significant learning experience that includes language, social studies, natural science and the arts

    Why should Michigan youth be involved?

    • To develop awareness, understanding and appreciation of other cultures that will last a lifetime.
    • China is an important country with one-fifth of the world’s population; it is the third largest country in the world.
    • Chinese culture is more than 3,500 years old—the oldest in the world—rich in the arts, science and philosophy.
    • China is home to the fastest-growing economy in the world.

    4-H Children’s Art Exchange and Teaching Kits

    Program participants are invited to send “visual letters” to children their own ages in China. Teaching kits are available to facilitate teaching about China and about making art. Each teaching kit is unique and consists of nine or ten original pictures by Chinese children, a study guide and a description of the pictures that come with the kit. A selection of Michigan artwork is then sent to China as a gift to the children of China. An announcement about the art exchange usually is sent to county MSU Extension offices in the fall. The deadline for submitting artwork to the State 4-H Office is usually early May. The 4-H Children’s Art Exchange kits are available for year-round use. (The study guide and description of the pictures from Kit A are also available in the Resources section below.) Contact your county MSU Extension office to borrow materials.

    2013 Michigan 4-H Children's Art Exchange“Visual Letters—The Art of Michigan Children” Traveling Art Exhibit

    View a selection of Michigan artwork from the following 4-H Children’s Art Exchange traveling exhibits: (Note: In Internet Explorer, Adobe PDF files will open in full screen mode. Press right and left arrow keys to advance or go back. Press escape to leave full screen mode.)

    Discover Chinese Dance Activity Kit for K-6th graders

    This kit is filled with silk dance costumes, papier-mache masks, rice straw hats, ribbon sticks and music for the Chinese Children’s Ribbon Dance. The materials help young people learn about classical and folk dance in China. A study guide is included to maximize this program’s effectiveness.

    Chinese Children’s Ribbon Dance

    This kit consists of 12 ribbon wands and an audiotape of music and dance instructions. The dances are easy to learn for dancers and non-dancers alike. The ribbon sticks are also fun for children to use to create their own dances.

    Discover the Children of China Audiovisual Program

    (Slide format and VHS video format)
    This audiovisual program encourages children to think about the daily lives of children their own ages who live in the People’s Republic of China. Visits to elementary classrooms, playgrounds and after-school art activities are included. The program is about 6 minutes long. A discussion guide for grades K-4 is included.

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or

    Jan Brinn
    Phone: 269-673-0370''269-673-0370
    Fax 269-673-7005
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Entrepreneurship

    Youth EntrepreneurWhat is 4-H Entrepreneurship?

    From market livestock animals and craft sales to worm farming and bio-fuel production, 4-H has been involved in entrepreneurship from its beginning.  Entrepreneurship combines business concepts and creativity. 4-H entrepreneurship programs can help you take an existing project to new levels or assist you in bringing a great idea to life while making a profit. 

    Forms of Entrepreneurship

    Entrepreneurship can come in many forms, including making improvements or finding new uses for existing products.  Entrepreneurs find solutions to problems, like turning waste products into renewable energy sources.  Entrepreneurs identify opportunities, such as selling cold pop on hot day.  Entrepreneurship can be a career path and avenue to a successful financial future, and being involved in 4-H entrepreneurship programs today can strengthen your existing skill set.

    Developing an entrepreneurial spirit through 4-H

    Entrepreneurial spirit is characterized by innovation and risk taking. Take a look at what 4-H has to help you create your own future, and how 4-H members from around the state of Michigan have embraced their entrepreneurial spirit!

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Michigan 4-H Youth Development
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 517-432-7575''517-432-7575

    Career Preparation

    your career ahead

    Position yourself to get paid! Get the job you want and build your future. Identify skills and learn how to prepare for your career.

    Career exploration is the “process in which an individual chooses an educational path or training or a job which fits their interests, skills and abilities.” (www.businessdictionary.com/definition/ career-exploration.html, retrieved 07-25-12)

    Workforce preparation refers to the skill-building and educational programming and training done with individuals to prepare them for work.

    The following resources are available to assist in planning for a career and job success.

    Career Exploration:

    • Tools (career assessment and planning)
    • Activities (job shadowing, career fairs)

    The Job:

    You may have heard this statement: “It’s not always the best person who gets the job, but the person best at getting the job.” Many experts agree, so it’s worth investing time to understand everything you can about:

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Michigan 4-H Youth Development
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 517-432-7575''517-432-7575

    Arts

    craftsExpress your creativity! Draw, paint, take photos, dance, clown, make music, work with wood or make crafts. Have fun and gain self-confidence as you build your performing and visual art skills.

    Did You Know…

    Young people who participate in the arts for at least three days each week for at least one year are:

    • Four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement
    • Three times more likely to be elected to class office within their schools
    • Four times more likely to participate in a math and science fair
    • Three times more likely to win an award for school attendance
    • Four times more likely to win an award for writing an essay or poem

    Source: Americans for the Arts, 2009

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office

    Or

    Michigan 4-H Youth Development
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 517-432-7575''517-432-7575

    Animal Science

    Think you have to live on or near a farm to work with animals in 4-H?
    Think . . . again!

    4-H Animal ScienceLots of people think 4-H is all about living on a farm and raising a cow or a pig, taking it to fair, winning a blue ribbon and maybe selling the animal to earn money for college. For some youth, that’s true, although there’s a lot more to it than that!

    But thousands of kids in 4-H work with animals and have never set foot on a farm. They’re working with dogs, cats, rabbits, hamsters, gerbils, birds, fish, snakes, turtles—you name it. Not only do you get to be with animals that make great companions, you’ll understand them so much better when you learn about what to feed them, how to train them and how to enhance their environment. By the way, all of those things? That’s why it’s called animal science!

    Caring for an animal is a big deal, so you’ll definitely learn to be responsible. If you could use a boost in confidence and want to get better at communicating, working with an animal could be right up your alley. And there’s nothing like working with an animal to help you feel connected to another living being.

    It can be fantastic, but it can also be hard. Seeing an animal being born is like….wow! Losing an animal friend could hurt, though. It’s all part of life, and working with animals let’s you learn to cope with all kinds of experiences.

    Contact

    For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

    Jacob DeDecker, PhD, 4-H program leader 
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 517-432-7604

    Upcoming Department of Animal Science events

    Cloverbuds (Ages 5-8)

    cloverbudsOur youngest 4-H’ers aren’t quite ready to participate in many of the project areas and/or activities that their older brothers and sisters can, but there’s still plenty for them to do in 4-H, starting with fun!

    The emphasis is on participation, learning and teamwork, not competition. They might learn about nutrition while helping to prepare simple snacks, plant seeds and learn what to do to help them grow, or help with animal grooming and feeding (with supervision).

    Cloverbuds also provide opportunities for older youth to mentor and help a younger 4-H’er be successful, and start laying the groundwork for their future “career” as a 4-H member.

    With Cloverbuds, safety comes first, and all of the activities are developmentally appropriate for this age group.

    To learn about Cloverbud participation opportunities in your area, contact your closest MSU Extension office.

    Contact:

    Sheila Urban Smith, 4-H program leader
    Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 517-432-7612

    4-H Scholarships

    4-H Scholarships

    General Eligibility:

    • 4-H involvement at county, regional, state, national and international levels
    • Outstanding achievement in 4-H
    • Scholastic excellence
    • Broad range of 4-H experiences and project involvement
    • Leadership and citizenship contributions within and outside of 4-H
    • Financial need (applies to 4-H Rabbit/Cavy scholarship only)

    For complete eligibility information refer to the guidelines within the scholarship application below.

    Michigan 4-H Youth Development Scholarships

    The 4-H Rabbit/Cavy Scholarship is the only scholarship available through this application for 2014.

    Michigan Rabbit/Cavy 4-H Scholarship

    Award amount: Varies, two to four given annually

    Who can apply:
    Those who will be college freshmen in the Fall 2015. Students must have been enrolled in a 4-H rabbit or cavy project for at least three years.

    Michigan State University Scholarships

    Michigan State University 4-H Scholarship

    Award amount: $2,500 annually for four consecutive years of full-time study at MSU. Six scholarships are given annually.

    Who can apply:
    4-H members who are high school seniors must apply to MSU and submit the MSU 4-H Scholarship Application by November 1 of their senior year. Applicants must meet the standard admissions requirements of the university and be accepted to MSU.

    Application form:

    MSU Admissions: http://admissions.msu.edu/

    Michigan State University Pre-College Program Scholarship

    Award amount: $2,000 applied toward the student’s first year at MSU as a degree-seeking student. Scholarship recipients are not guaranteed admission to MSU and must meet admission requirements upon submitting the MSU application as an incoming undergraduate.)

    Who can apply: Students in 8th, 9th or 10th grade following their MSU pre-college program involvement (such as 4-H Exploration Days, 4-H Great Lakes & Natural Resources Camp, 4-H Renewal Energy Camp, 4-H Animal & Veterinary Science Camp or 4-H Capitol Experience). Students will be invited to apply by their county MSU Extension 4-H staff for Exploration Days or the pre-college program director for GLNR Camp, Renewable Energy Camp, 4-H Animal & Veterinary Science Camp and Capitol Experience.

    Because of the large number of eligible students, a maximum of five percent of eligible enrollment can be nominated from each program. This is a competitive application process from all of MSU’s pre-college programs. Students must complete the MSU Pre-College Scholarship Application Packet in its entirety by the specified deadlines. Forms must be to the State CYI/4-H office by the fall deadline.

    Visit the MSU Spartan Youth Programs website at to learn about other MSU pre-college programs.

    Michigan 4-H Foundation Scholarships

    The Michigan 4-H Foundation offers scholarships to attend Michigan State University. There is no separate application process for these awards scholarships – recipients are selected from the MSU 4-H Youth Development Scholarship applicant pool.

    Funding 4-H Youth Development Scholarships

    Contact the Michigan 4-H Foundation if you would like to help support 4-H youth in their pursuit of a college education. There are various ways you can make a gift to create a 4-H scholarship fund.

    Contact:

    Jacob DeDecker, Program Leader
    Michigan State University Extension
    Children & Youth Institute / 4-H Youth Development
    E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Phone: 517-432-7604

    4-H Recognition Program

    4-H Awards and Recognition Program

    “It’s great to be recognized!”

    Whether you’re a youth or an adult volunteer, if you’re doing great 4-H work, there are lots of ways to be recognized for it! Check with your county to see which opportunities are available where you live. 

    YOUTH RECOGNITION

    Project medals

    While each county establishes its own criteria for giving these medals, if you are an outstanding member between the ages of 11 and 13, you may be especially likely to be considered for one of the medals which celebrates your excellent work in a particular project area. There is no general application process, but each county may have a process of their own for determining medal recipients.

    Michigan 4-H Key Club Award

    The 4-H Key Club Award is intended to be the top county 4-H honor, and selections are made at the county level. To be eligible, a 4-H member must:

    • Be 15 years old by the beginning of the project year (September 1)
    • Have completed three calendar years of club work as of January 1 of the current year
    • Have completed 4-H projects in at least two project areas
    • Have completed a teen leadership project
    • Have participated in three regional or state 4-H events
    • Be recommended by his or her 4-H leader

    You may download the Application for Michigan 4-H Key Club Award here.

    State 4-H Awards Program

    This is the highest honor bestowed on Michigan 4-H youth. This program is for 4-H youth aged 13 and up with at least three years of 4-H experience. All youth who meet these requirements are encouraged to apply. Youth compete in 19 different award areas showcasing their knowledge, skills and experiences.

    To apply, youth submit the State 4-H Awards application to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) by March 1. Applications are carefully reviewed by selection committees and delegates are announced by April 1. Delegates are invited to participate in either an advanced leadership development program (juniors) or competitive interviews (seniors) during 4-H Exploration Days on June 18. State 4-H Award winners will be announced at the 4-H Recognition Program, held at the prestigious Huntington Club in Spartan Stadium, June 19 during 4-H Exploration Days.

      State 4-H Award winners become a part of an elite group of 4-H youth who have demonstrated the highest level of excellence. While all State 4-H Award winners receive a plaque, seniors receive a $200 cash award, while juniors receive a $50 cash award.

      Congratulations 2014 State 4-H Awards Delegates!

      See the live presentation and recognition program at the MSU Stadium at http://vimeo.com/98675795.

      4-H Mark of Excellence Award

      If you are 11 or 12 years old, you could be the recipient of the 4-H Mark of Excellence Award. To enter, you write an essay on the theme, “Because of 4-H I can …” Counties select their representatives and submit names and essays to the State 4-H Awards Committee. For more information and instructions, see the “Overview and Instructions” link above.

      Prudential Spirit of Community Awards

      If you are a 4-H’er in 5th to 12th grade who does a lot of volunteer activities, you may want to apply for a Prudential Spirit of Community Award, sponsored by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals. You can apply online at http://spirit.prudential.com or www.principals.org/spirit. Applications must be submitted to a county 4-H educator by November 1. For more information visit Prudential Spirit of Community Awards.

      Volunteer recognition

      Michigan 4-H Salute to Excellence Awards

      The Michigan 4-H Salute to Excellence Awards highlight the important work of 4-H volunteers across the state. Volunteers are, undeniably, the “heart and soul” of 4-H, and in an age when time is at a premium, the Michigan 4-H Salute to Excellence Award serves as an opportunity to acknowledge our volunteers’ unwavering dedication to Michigan 4-H Youth Development. These awards honor outstanding volunteers for their dedication to youth. There are two categories for nominations:

      • The Lifetime Volunteer Award is presented to a 4-H volunteer with more than ten years of service.
      • The Volunteer of the Year Award is presented to a 4-H volunteer with ten years of service or less.

      These awards are patterned after the national 4-H Salute to Excellence Awards. Currently, Michigan 4-H does not have an organized system for providing state, regional or national recognition to its volunteers.  Instituting this award in Michigan provides us with this opportunity and assists in the identification and selection of individuals to be nominated for the national Lifetime Volunteer Award and Volunteer of the Year Award.

      Each year, counties are invited to nominate two outstanding individual volunteers, one in each of two categories. A state winner and runner up will be selected in each category. Recipients of the Michigan 4-H Salute to Excellence Volunteer Recognition Awards will be chosen from nominees submitted by county 4-H offices.  Each year the recipients of the Michigan 4-H Lifetime Volunteer Award and the 4-H Volunteer of the Year Award will be submitted for regional and national recognition honors. Recipients of each award will be presented with a plaque and asked to designate a 4-H program, club or activity to be the recipient of a $400 monetary award in their name. Awardees will also have their name engraved on the Salute to Excellence Perpetual Plaques to be located at Kettunen Center in Tustin Michigan. 

      Michigan Farm Bureau 4-H Excellence in Agriculture Award

      Michigan Farm Bureau 4-H Excellence in AgricultureThe Michigan Farm Bureau 4-H Excellence in Agriculture Award recognizes outstanding achievements of Michigan 4-H volunteers or groups that have exhibited excellence in 4-H youth education and leadership development in the areas of 4-H beef cattle; dairy cattle; goats; horses; horticulture, crops and soils; poultry; rabbits; sheep; swine; and veterinary science. Honorees choose where their $1,000 recognition award will go to advance Michigan 4-H youth development programming in agriculture. Visit the Michigan 4-H Foundation web site for the application materials.

      Contact

      Jacob DeDecker, Ph.D., 4-H Program Leader
      Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
      Phone: 517-432-7604

      Join

      Join 4-H!

      Join the ClubWonder how tap dancers do the paradiddle?
      Curious how many eggs chickens lay?
      Love horses but live in town?
      Dream of inventing a robot to do your chores?
      Curious how rabbits air-condition themselves?
      Itching to learn about poison ivy?
      Wonder how to become president?
      Curious how bees make a buzz?
      Dream about hitting a bulls-eye?
      Thumb more brown than green?
      Looking for an all-in-one activity?

      Life’s little questions aren’t meant to be answered alone. Join 4-H where kids learn practical things like pet care, growing gardens or building things – and important values like responsibility.

      Whether you’re in the city or boonies, join 4-H and we’ll tackle life’s little questions together.

      What’s the point of 4-H?

      Great kids are those that exemplify the four H’s, and our mission is to make that happen.

      Head – Make sound decisions, set goals and stick with them, and have practical skills needed to lead a productive, fulfilling life.

      Heart – Act with integrity and accountability, and help others become their best.

      Hands – Put the needs of the community before their own while serving others.

      Health – Actively take care of their minds and bodies.

      How does 4-H work?

      Join a club!

      4-H clubs are groups of youth and volunteers who meet on a regular basis. This could be monthly or some other timeframe that works best for the group. Meetings give youth opportunities to share project work, plan community service activities, and practice running meetings. There are “sub-clubs” for individual projects, led by adults or teens within the club.

      4-H runs programs in every Michigan county. Youth ages 5 to 19, from cities, suburbs, towns and rural settings participate as members. Adults age 19+ can join as volunteers.

      To join a club, the participation fee per youth is $10 per year or $30 per family (with three or more youth). Some types of projects have additional costs for supplies, equipment, travel, etc.

      Call your closest MSU Extension office by dialing toll-free 1-888-MSUE-4MI (1-888-678-3464) and entering the first five letters of your county’s name. Ask to speak with someone about joining 4-H. To locate a county office visit the MSUExtension county office list.

      Pick projects.

      Members choose from a range of projects, based on their interests and the availability of a knowledgeable adult in the community to serve as a mentor/leader. Through these projects, members set goals, learn the skills needed to achieve goals, and exhibit/demonstrate their skills at events like county fairs, speaking contests and other competitions. Visit “Programs” (http://4h.msue.msu.edu/programs) for a full list.

      Pick projects

       

      Michigan 4-H FAQ’s

      Michigan 4-H FAQ’s

      4-H Motto: To make the best better

      What are the four H’s?

      Head, Heart, Hands and Health

      • Head – 4-H lets kids take the lead—with the help of adult partners—in thinking, learning and problem-solving.
      • Heart – 4-H helps kids build strong relationships with peers and adults based on caring and respect.
      • Hands – 4-H lets kids learn by doing and then use their talents and skills to make their communities better places in which to live and grow.
      • Health – 4-H helps kids make healthy choices to keep them physically and mentally able to do what they need to at school, at home and in their communities.

      What is the 4-H pledge?

      I pledge…

      My head to clearer thinking,
      My heart to greater loyalty,
      My hands to better service,
      My health to better living,
      For my club, my community, my country and my world.

      What is the 4-H motto?

      “To make the best better.”

      Who is involved in 4-H?

      4-H Pledge

      4-H Youth Development is located in every corner of Michigan. Each year, more than 200,000 youth and 20,000+ adult and older teen volunteers from major cities, suburbs, towns and rural communities participate in 4-H. Nationally, 4-H youth programs involve more than five million young people from all 50 states and many U.S. territories.

      Who operates 4-H?

      4-H Youth Development is delivered locally and operated at the state and national levels through a partnership between county governments, Michigan State University Extension and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This partnership ensures that what 4-H promises in outcomes for young people is backed by the research and knowledge base of the nation’s premier land-grant university and the support of county, state and federal governments.

      How old do you have to be to join?

      4-H programs are open to youth aged 5 to 19. Adults aged 19 and older are encouraged to join 4-H as volunteers.

      How do you join 4-H and how much does it cost?

      Call the closest MSU Extension office by dialing toll-free 1-888-MSUE-4MI (1-888-678-3464) and entering the first five letters of your county’s office. Ask to speak with someone about joining 4-H.

      To join a club, the participation fee per youth is $10 per year or $30 per family (with three or more youth). Some types of projects have additional costs for supplies, equipment, travel, etc.

      What do 4-H volunteers do?

      Adult and teen volunteers work at the local and state level to support experiential learning activities for youth. 4-H volunteers are club, group or resource leaders, middle management leaders, advisory council members and Michigan 4-H Foundation trustees.

      How do you become a 4-H volunteer?

      Information on becoming a volunteer is available in the “Volunteers” area of this site.

      What do 4-H state and county staff members do?

      4-H staff members lead and support the work of 4-H volunteers and members in each county. They cooperate with other MSU Extension campus and county staff members, with local, regional and state partners, and are oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach to program design, implementation and evaluation.

      Who are state 4-H specialists?

      State 4-H specialists have part- or full-time appointments within MSU academic departments including Animal Science, Crop and Soil Science, Family and Child Ecology, Fisheries and Wildlife, Forestry, Food Science and Human Nutrition, Horticulture, Human Environment and Design, Veterinary Medicine and the MSU Museum. Specialists provide links between academic departments, content area expertise and research opportunities.

      What is the 4-H mission?

      To create nonformal, educational opportunities to help youth thrive in a complex and changing world.

      What is our programming philosophy?

      • Provide age-appropriate life skill development
      • Emphasize research-based experiential learning
      • Involve volunteers
      • Engage a variety of partners
      • Include families
      • Reach both diverse and underserved audiences
      • Be accessible
      • Promote a multicultural perspective and appreciation
      • Have fun!

      Learning Materials

      More information on learning materials available to support 4-H activities can be found in the “Programs” area of this site or through the MSU Extension Bookstore

      Training & Events

      For upcoming 4-H training and events, check the “Events” area of this site.

      Michigan 4-H Guiding Principles

      Michigan 4-H Guiding Principles for Positive Youth Development
      4-H Pledge

      Michigan 4-H sticks to some basic guiding principles that define how it approaches its work with youth. If you want to read the full document, you can download Michigan 4-H Guiding Principles as an Adobe PDF handout. 

      Here’s the quick version.

      1. Youth develop positive relationships with adults and peers.
      2. Youth are physically and emotionally safe.
      3. Youth are actively engaged in their own development.
      4. Youth are considered participants rather than recipients in the learning process.
      5. Youth develop skills that help them succeed. 
      6. Youth recognize, understand and appreciate multiculturalism.
      7. Youth grow and contribute as active citizens through service and leadership.

       

       

      Volunteer

      Want to make a difference? Eager to give back to your community? Need a resume builder? Looking to leave a legacy? Enjoy working with young people? Ready to share your special talent? Want to learn a new skill?

      There are a lot of reasons to become a Michigan 4-H volunteer! A program of Michigan State University (MSU) Extension, Michigan 4-H is the largest youth development organization in the state, with more than 200,000 youth participating in countless ways. From veterinary science to performing arts, science and technology to youth entrepreneurship, and communications to outdoor and environmental education, today’s 4-H programs are so much more than farm animals—although we have those too!

      At the core of Michigan 4-H, and critical to the success of its youth, are more than 20,000 volunteers who give their time and talents to 4-H’ers. These volunteers serve in a number of capacities: some choose to help at camp, teach a workshop or lead a club, while others chaperone an event, lend their professional skills or help at the fair. As they provide hands-on guidance and real-world experience, these volunteers also offer young people another crucially important element: a healthy adult role model who helps to build their confidence and ignite their dreams for the future.

      So whether you want to pass your skills on to a new generation, give back to the community, leave a legacy or something else, invest in the future of Michigan as a 4-H volunteer. By giving your time to young people in your community, you’ll help them answer life’s little questions, achieve big dreams and prepare for a lifetime of success.

      Interested in becoming a 4-H volunteer but have some questions of your own? Check out the FAQs section to learn more.

      Responsibilities & Procedures

      4-H Exploration Days

      Responsibilities & Procedures

      2014 Theme

      MSU Extension 4-H Exploration Days 2014 Program Handbook

      The 4-H Exploration Days Handbook includes the Michigan 4-H Youth Code of Conduct and 4-H Exploration Days Rules. All participants, volunteers and staff members are expected to abide by the code of conduct, the event rules and all other MSU regulations in order to attend this program. Everyone involved in this program must sign an agreement stating they’ve read, understand and agree to the Michigan 4-H Code of Conduct and program rules in order to be allowed to participate in the program.

      Responsibilities and procedures follow for 4-H Exploration Days youth and adult participants as well as for adult chaperones, county conference assistants, head conference assistants, session instructors and helpers, county field staff, and hosts.

      Youth Participants

      All youth should have either a full session assignment or two half session assignments before they arrive to Exploration Days. It is very important that all youth pick their own session choices during registration to eliminate the need for session changes at the event. Eight different choices should be listed on each participant’s registration form.

      4-H Exploration Days teaches responsibility, not as a burden, but as a sense of connection and empowerment. All youth and adult participants must abide by the Code of Conduct. This is required for participation at 4-H Exploration Days. Please sign and return the form given in the back of the 4-H Exploration Days registration book as directed.

      Adult Responsibilities

      Adult Roles
      Chaperones
      County Conference Assistants (CCAs)
      Head Conference Assistants (HCAs)
      Session Instructors

      Session Helpers
      County Field Staff
      Hosts
      Volunteer Code of Conduct Authorization Form

      Youth Responsibilities

      MI 4-H Youth Code of Conduct
      Youth Code of Conduct Authorization Form

      Overall Event Procedures

      Check-In Information
      4-H Information Centers
      General Headquarters
      Youth/Chaperone Huddles
      Bed Checks
      Guidelines for Handling Behavior Problems
      Health Care & Emergencies
      Check-Out Information

      Contact

      For more information on 4-H Exploration Days, contact:

      Judy Ratkos, Senior Program Leader
      Phone: 517-432-7613''517-432-7613
      Fax: 517-353-4846
      Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      OR

      Laura Potter, Educational Programs Events Coordinator
      Phone: 517-432-2963''517-432-2963
      Fax: 517-353-4846
      Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      4-H Youth Development
      Michigan State University Extension
      160 Agriculture Hall
      East Lansing, MI  48824-1039

      What’s New

      4-H Exploration Days

      Different Residence Halls & Event General Headquarters Location in 2014

      Participants will be housed in Holmes, Hubbard and McDonel Halls. (Akers is not available due to renovations.) The General Event Headquarters will be in West Holmes Hall.

      MSU Extension 4-H Exploration Days 2014 Program Handbook

      The 4-H Exploration Days Handbook includes the Michigan 4-H Youth Code of Conduct and 4-H Exploration Days Rules. All participants, volunteers and staff members are expected to abide by the code of conduct, the event rules and all other MSU regulations in order to attend this program. Everyone involved in this program must sign an agreement stating they’ve read, understand and agree to the Michigan 4-H Code of Conduct and program rules in order to be allowed to participate in the program.

      Menu

      MSU Culinary Services offers a wide variety of entrees and side dish choices to choose from at each meal. Most people with special dietary needs can make selections that fit their needs without making any special arrangements.  View menu here.

      Wednesday Evening Wharton Center Entertainment

      S2014 Themecience in the Movies!

      See the secret science behind movie stunts and special effects!  Stunt and Special Effects Coordinator Steve Wolf will reveal how science and math concepts are used to create the spectacular feats and special effects seen in movies! Steve’s exciting, fast paced and funny presentation will include stunt performances and engaging audience interaction.

      Steve Wolf has designed, engineered, and performed stunts and special effects for feature films and television shows, including Cast Away (with Tom Hanks), The Firm (with Tom Cruise), America’s Most Wanted, Crocodile Dundee II, and many more. He’s received the “Best Science Presenter of the Year” award from Time Warner Cable.  His entertainment clients include Paramount, Disney, Fox, Warner Bros., ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, MTV, HBO and Discovery.

      Ignite your interest in science! Don’t miss this fun and interactive show.

      ''How that Works

      Contact

      For more information on 4-H Exploration Days, contact:

      Judy Ratkos, Senior Program Leader
      Phone: 517-432-7613
      Fax: 517-343-4846
      Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      OR

      Laura Potter, Educational Programs Events Coordinator
      Phone: 517-432-2963
      Fax: 517-353-4846
      Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      4-H Youth Development
      Michigan State University Extension
      446 W. Circle Dr., Rm. 240
      Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture
      East Lansing, MI  48824

      4-H Capitol Experience

      4-H Capitol Experience
      March 22-25, 2015

      Preparing for Active Citizenship

      Registration Link: http://events.anr.msu.edu/4hcapex

      4-H Capitol Experience is an annual 4-day conference that focuses on civic engagement and public policy. Up to 100 teens from around the state converge on Lansing, Michigan to experience state government in action and learn how they can influence policy issues. Participants interact with legislators, state agency staff, lobbyists and other resource people to learn how policy is made. Attendees will:

      • Understand the responsibilities of a citizen
      • Explore different aspects of a policy issue that may affect individuals and communities
      • Explore various careers in public policy
      • Attend bill writing session
      • Have an in-depth meeting with someone in (or involved with) state government

      If you want to see more, you can check out this video

      Simulations and activities are incorporated to reinforce and apply what is learned about government. Teens leave the conference with the charge to share what they have learned and get involved with other leadership and civic engagement activities in their communities!

      Learn more by reviewing the one-page 2014 Impact Summary.

      A letter for your school is available for the days at the event.

      Promotional Flyers


      Find 4-H Capitol Experience on Facebook!

      Scholarships for up to half the participant cost ($155.00) are now available.  To qualify, a completed application must be sent to the State office as outlined on the scholarship application.

      About the 2014 Conference

      When and where: 3 p.m. Sunday, March 16, 2014 to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 19, 2014. Tours and agency visits will take place at the State Capitol and surrounding area.

      Who should attend: High school students at least 14 years old and adult participant-chaperones. All participants must have pictured identification.

      Cost: $310 4-H members, $320 non 4-H members. Includes all meals, lodging and material fees. Counties will be billed after the event.

      Registration deadlines: Registrations are due in the county offices by February 7, 2014. Registrations are due in the State 4-H Office by February 14, 2014.

      Registration Link: http://events.anr.msu.edu/4hcapex/

      Registration Forms:

      Cancellation policy: Once selected by the State 4-H Office to attend, the cancellation policy is as follows:

      • Up to February 14, 2014: Conference fees fully refundable minus $30 handling fee.
      • After February 14, 2014: No refunds after this date.

      Application process: Participants who have attended in previous years will be considered based on space available. Space is limited to 100 teen and adult chaperone-participants. Each teen or adult participant-chaperone will need to apply online. Contact your county MSU Extension office for more details. 

      Pre-conference activities: Participants complete a pre-conference activity to learn about citizenship at the local level. Examples include attending a local government meeting, interviewing the director or staff member of a non-profit organization or researching a local issue. All selected participants should write a letter to their representative and senator indicating their interest in meeting them at the conference. Visit Pre-conference activities for more activity ideas.

      Post-conference activities, news releases & photographs: Participants should return to their county 4-H program and get involved with local public policy issues. Examples include giving an educational presentation on the conference to 4-H clubs, researching a local issue and presenting it to the county commissioners, city councils or township boards or participating in a service project. Participants should work with their county delegation to carry out a local project. Visit Post-conference activities to find activities and resources to help clubs and groups learn more about the political process.

      A Web link to a post-event news release and county delegation photograph of participants and their legislator(s) will be e-mailed to counties for distribution to local media following the event.

      To Find Out More About Michigan’s Capitol

      You can visit a variety of Michigan government and institutional sites to learn more about Michigan, the state’s history and society:

      Contact:

      For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

      .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 4-H Educator
      Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
      Phone: 734-222-3877

      4-H Volunteer Workshops

      4-H Volunteer Training Workshops

      September 1, 2014 to August 31, 2015

      Kettunen Center and Kellogg Biological Station

      The 2014-15 Michigan 4-H Volunteer Training Series is supported by the Michigan 4-H Foundation with gifts made by donors and supporters like you.

      Soon you will be provided a link for the instructions for registration in the Michigan State University ANR Event Registration system.  As descriptions are built into the new system, the URL for registration will also become available on this page.  There will be a unique URL for each workshop.  Also, included is the Code of Conduct/Medical/Media Release form required for all workshop participants.

      Michigan State University Extension Participant Age Policy

      All state 4-H volunteer training coordinated by state 4-H staff falls into one of the formats listed below:

      • Adult and Teen Volunteer Training – Open to adult and teen volunteer leaders ages 13 and up.
      • Adult-Only Volunteer Training – Open to adult volunteer leaders ages 19 and up.
      • Learning Lab Training – Open to kids in a specific age group who will work on project-related tasks while adults and teens ages 14 and up learn to work with the younger kids.
      • Content-Specific Training – Open to young people and adults in project areas with age limits for safety reasons (such as shooting sports, limited to 4-H’ers ages 16 and up) or subject matter (such as Peer Plus, limited to 4-H’ers ages 14 and up).
      • Family Weekend Workshops – Open to families with children ages 5 to 12.
      • Youth Training – Open to 4-H youth of a specified age range only (such as the 4-H Teen Horse Volunteer Leader Conference). The only adults allowed to register for these workshops are accompanying chaperones.

      The workshop format will be set by the state 4-H programming committee and the state 4-H staff members who coordinate the training sessions held at Kettunen Center, Kellogg Biological Station and other Michigan sites. Use a 4-H member’s age by January 1 of the current program year (that is, January 1, 2015) to decide whether he or she is eligible to attend a particular workshop.

      Workshop Listing

      Events

      Press Releases

      About

      About Michigan 4-H Youth Development

      First, let’s talk about what 4-H isn’t.

      • It’s not just for kids who live on farms—although lots of kids who live on farms are in 4-H.
      • It’s not just about raising and selling animals—although some kids in 4-H do exactly that.
      • It’s not just about doing projects that you show at a fair—although lots of kids in 4-H do that too.

      So what is 4-H about?

      • Having fun and not being BORED!
      • Making some great friends
      • Doing things you’ve always been interested in
      • Doing things you never knew you were interested in
      • Being a scientist
      • Being an entrepreneur
      • Discovering you can be a leader—and you’re good at it
      • Learning you can make a difference in your community, or even your state
      • Building your self-confidence

      There’s so much to do in 4-H, it’s too big to fit on this page!

      For parents

      4-H is the largest youth development organization in Michigan, with more than 200,000 youth between the ages of 5 and 19 participating. Because Michigan 4-H is part of Michigan State University Extension, the activities your kids participate in are all backed by and based on child development research. We use experiential (i.e. hands-on) learning and time spent intentionally thinking about what’s been learned to make it a meaningful experience, with skills and ideas learned that last a lifetime.

      It’s a fact: kids who participate in 4-H get better grades, are more likely to go to college, are less likely to use drugs, cigarettes or alcohol, and are more likely to give back to their communities. 

      They may be learning to be a photographer, building their own robot, growing a garden, writing and performing a song, or raising an animal, but what they are really doing is learning to be a leader, building their self-confidence, growing their awareness of good citizenship, writing their own future and raising their expectations—of themselves.

      To learn more about the impact 4-H Youth Development has on the lives of youth, refer to “Michigan State University Extension 4-H Youth Development Fast Facts.”

      For (potential) volunteers

      Plain and simple, 4-H needs you. Our organization depends on volunteers to deliver its programming to youth. There are more than 20,000 4-H volunteers in Michigan and we could not exist without them. You don’t have to know anything special to be a volunteer. You just have to want to make a difference in the lives of kids and families. We’ll train you. We’ll support you. We’ll respect you. We’ll thank you.

      Contact

      For more information on how to get involved as a youth or volunteer, contact your county MSU Extension office or:

      4-H Youth Development
      E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
      Phone: 517-432-7575

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      4-H Exploration Days

      4-H Exploration Days

      Next year’s program will be June 24-26, 2015

      What’s It All About?

      Every year, approximately 2,500 youth (ages 11-19) and chaperones from every Michigan county (or close to it), come stay at MSU for 4-H Exploration Days. This really fun MSU pre-college program could be the highlight of your summer - it could even change your life!

      4-H Exploration Days registration goes from mid-March through April with session assignments made on a first-come, first-served basis. As you select your session choices, be sure to watch for age restrictions! Age requirements for sessions are based on your age as of January 1.

      This MSU pre-college program is designed to:

      • Increase responsibility, confidence, independence, accountability, problem-solving, decision-making and time management skills.
      • Increase communication, team work, citizenship, and leadership skills.
      • Foster ability to meet new people and make new friends from different places and backgrounds.
      • Develop and expand career and personal interests.
      • Increase college exploration and access to the Michigan State Universitycampus and its resources.
      • Develop social and academic skills needed for a successful transition to college and life as an adult.
      • Give youth opportunities to try things that aren’t available in their county.

      Learn more by reviewing the one-page 2014 Impact Summary and the 2014 Full Evaluation Report.  A total of 1,544 youth (80.6%) and 236 (55%) adults completed evaluations. The number of respondents from each county is available separately. Open-ended survey comments by youth are also available separately and are identified by county and MSUE district.

      What’s it like?

      • There’ll be more than 200 session choices held on and off campus. You’ll choose one or two for your three-day stay.
      • You’ll live in a Michigan State University dorm and eat in the cafeteria—just like MSU students do.
      • Sessions are taught by people who know their stuff, including MSU faculty members, 4-H volunteers and staff members and other experts.
      • It’s not all sessions! There’s plenty of time for fun, including swimming, skating, souvenir shopping, exploring, bowling, basketball—even a great dance Thursday night.
      • The 2015 cost hasn’t been determined yet. The fee includes meals, a shared room in a dorm, sessions and a t-shirt. You may wish to check with your county MSU Extension office to see if scholarship funds are available.
      • Registration opens March 17, 2015. Registration books that show all of the sessions and details on everything happening during Exploration Days will be available online and from county Extension offices in March.
      • Registration deadlines (usually the end of April) vary by county, so check with your county MSU Extension office. Don’t wait until the deadline though, because popular sessions fill up fast!
      • Contact the 4-H staff in your county MSU Extension officefor more information on 4-H Exploration Days, and any specific details pertaining to your county’s delegation.

      How to Enroll

      Youth must be age 11 by January 1 in order to attend.  All participants must submit their forms and payments to the county MSU Extension office (forms are at the back of the registration book).

      If you need to obtain contact information of your county 4-H staff, visit: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/county/ and click on your county name. The county 4-H staff there will process your registration and payment with the State MSUE/4-H office. County 4-H staff manage the recruitment, chaperone and orientation process.

      For Parents and Volunteers

      Each year participant evaluation responses are overwhelmingly positive. Many parents and 4-H volunteers notice improvements in their children’s interest, knowledge and social skills after they attend 4-H Exploration Days. Participants often return to MSU as students due to the positive experiences they’ve had during 4-H Exploration Days.

      All adults who attend 4-H Exploration Days will serve as a session host, activity host, instructor, session helper or county conference assistant; in addition to any role held as a staff member or volunteer chaperone for a county delegation. There must be at least one chaperone for every 10 youths of the same gender. 

      Volunteer instructors, session helpers and county conference assistants attend the event at no cost. County-based MSU Extension staff who serve as session instructors or CCAs will receive full scholarships; county staff who serve as session helpers will receive $80 scholarships.


      Video and Podcast Previews of the Event

      Related Programs

      For information about the pre-college programs offered at MSU, please visit Spartan Youth Programs at http://www.spartanyouth.msu.edu. You’ll find a multitude of programs that can help you develop valuable skills, make new friends and taste college life.

      Contact

      For information regarding registration, scholarship support, housing and orientation, contact the MSU Extension 4-H staff in the county where you live. If you need to obtain contact information for your county MSUE 4-H staff, visit: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/county/and click on your county name.

      For general information regarding 4-H Exploration Days, contact:

      Judy Ratkos, Senior Program Leader
      Phone: 517-432-7613
      Fax: 517-353-4846
      Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      OR:

      Laura Potter, Educational Programs Event Coordinator
      Phone: 517-432-2963
      Fax: 517-353-4846
      Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      4-H Youth Development
      Michigan State University Extension
      446 W. Circle Dr., Rm. 240
      Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture
      East Lansing, MI  48824-1039

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      4-H Youth Development | Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture | 446 W. Circle Drive Room 160 | East Lansing, MI, 48824 | .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)